Nancy Grace on Arias Defense's Big 'Boo Boo'

Dan Abrams and Nancy Grace discuss the Arizona murder trial.
4:02 | 05/02/13

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Transcript for Nancy Grace on Arias Defense's Big 'Boo Boo'
Time now for our legal team to weigh in. "Gma" legal analyst dan abrams and nancy grace, host of her own show on hln. Nancy, you've been on the trial from the start. Who is going to play you in the lifetime movie? You know what, a lot of people have asked me about the lifetime movie. Bottom line, I'm more concerned about what's happening in the real courtroom than what's going to be on a movie after the verdict. You know, we were all up last night till about 3:00 waiting to digest all of the testimony. But I'm sure that jury was wide awake just like we were. So I can see the dryness in your voice. You don't think that last day made any difference? Well, I think it was interesting that they tried to catch the medical examiner in a snafu in the autopsy report. The defense made the grave mistake by bringing on a shrink psychologist to talk about the bullet injury to the brain suggesting it did not go through the frontal lobe of the brain and the significance is if it didn't, travis alexander could still be chasing jodi arias even with a gunshot wound to the head. That's ridiculous. You got to have an m.D., A medical examiner, for instance, to talk about that so that was a big boo-boo in the late night hours by the defense. Dan, closing arguments coming up then go inside the jury room. Take us inside that room and on a trial like this, do you think that -- at the end the jury goes with their gut on whether they like or believe arias or go through the evidence. Sometimes people underestimate what juries do in long trials. Yes, occasionally there's an o.J. Simpson case where you have a nine-month trial and three or four-hour deliberation. Either what happens is, number one, the jurors go in and take an initial vote. A lot of the time you see them go in and say, what do you think? That doesn't always remain the same by the time they leave. Other times they won't take a vote at the outset and start piecing the evidence together. The difference in this case is it's not a whodunit, so they don't need to piece together all of these evidence to say, oh, it's -- the question is, why did she do it? And I think as a result, that's a different kind of analysis that the jury is going to have to go through and as a result, i would think that they would probably start by giving each other an indication of what they think about her guilt in terms of the crime. Nancy, given the point that dan just made -- a pretty good idea why, though. I got a pretty good idea why. After she had sex with him all day long he told her he's going to take another woman to cancun, oops. I shot him and stabbed him to death. That's what happened. Well, nancy, that's interesting, though, if that's the case and what you believe, that kind of cuts away a little bit against premeditation, doesn't it? Absolutely not. Because bottom line, when she goes to see him, she crosses the desert in a fake car that she rented, the tag upside down, dyes her hair first, carries gas cans so she doesn't have to stop at a gas station and leave a trail, turns off her cell phone she can't be triangulated to go and change his mind about the cancun trip. That was the marathon sex day, well, it didn't work. Surprisingly -- that's the most -- to manipulate a man. The most important thing in the case as far as I'm concerned, can the prosecutors convince this jury of the things that nancy just laid out? In addition to the fact that a 25 caliber gun was stolen from her grandparents' home and it was a 25 caliber bullet that killed him. Those are all the issues I think together that focus on premeditation. If these jurors believe that jodi arias is in big trouble. If these jurors have questions, even a couple of them have questions about premeditation, that's a huge win for jodi arias that's the point. Only one or two need to have questions. Right, well, to hang the jury potentially and that's why the deliberations in a case like this become so important because they're not going to be fighting over who did it. They'll be focusing on very, very minute details of what happened here. Okay, dan, nancy, thanks very much.

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

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