Las Vegas hospitals treat more than 400 injured in shooting

Dr. John Andrew Boockvar, a neurosurgeon at New York City's Lenox Hill Hospital, and ABC News' Dr. Jennifer Aston describe how hospitals respond to mass shootings.
3:58 | 10/02/17

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Transcript for Las Vegas hospitals treat more than 400 injured in shooting
The tragedy unfolding at a country music festival in las Vegas. Dr. John bookvar is the vice chair of surgery at Lennox hospital and Dr. Jen Ashton is in Puerto Rico. Doctor, when you hear the hospitals in Las Vegas say they are prepared how are you prepared? Well, you have to practice. We practice all the time for these casualty events. It sounds like the university medical center practiced and was prepared. You have to develop a Mand center and commanding officer who can instruct the tri age needed. Sounds like battlefield. It is like battlefield. You have to have a bin rooburn room, a broken bone room and a family room. Dr. Jen Ashton talk about what was happening on the scene. I expect we'll hear about scenes of heroics on the scene by lay people, bystanders and first responders. People on the scene in terms of mass tragedy and gunshot wound can save lives by applying direct pressure. In the first seconds and minutes of a shooting what kills people is massive hemorrhage on the scene. Yes, we absolutely expect total chaos on the scene and command centers from a position of trauma and triage to occur not just on the scene but sometimes outside the hospital in a tent, pal scenario and inside the hospital. Very much like a ripple effect we will expect that level one trauma center at umc, which is the only one in the state of Nevada, will be talking to the outlying hospital because obviously one level one trauma center cannot accommodate 400 patient within one to two hours. There will be a ripple effect of communication in terms of care and yes possibly some patients will need to be medevaced or flown as far as Los Angeles or other trauma centers. Blood banks will be taxed. Hospitals will go on emergency divertion. They have won't accept anymore patients in that immediate period of time. We heard from one of our reporters who said they were the walking wounded. They had an injury to the knee and were discharged. Talk about the others in critical condition. This kind of ammunition that was used is -- causes such havoc on the body. The important thing is triage and life threatening injuries have to be triaged and the surgeons and critical care specialists have to be there on site. One of the mistakes made is when we get called for a trauma everyone goes to the emergency room to help. A command center away from the emergency room is important. We're not supposed to go to the emergency room. We're supposed to go to a designated site and directed by the commander to go where we're needed. The first responders triage and if we're needed in the operating room we go there.

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

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