Reader's Digest's Hotel Insider Guide

Becky Worley shares secrets hotel desk clerks won't tell you about.
3:00 | 10/04/12

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Transcript for Reader's Digest's Hotel Insider Guide
America runs on dunkin' coffee. So much fun. We're back with everything you need to know before you check into a hotel. "Reader's digest" is packed with insiders advice to save you time, money and headaches in all areas of your life. Becky worley brings you the secrets that the hotel desk clerk will not tell you. Reporter: A new city, a new hotel. This is it. But getting a good room, for that, you need the inside scoop. Let's start way before you arrive. First, check prices at the hotel site and at online travel site to get a sense of the published rates. But don't book yet. Call the hotel using their local number, not the 800 reservation number. The front desk person who answers has way more room to help you get a good rate. But one secret. Don't call between 9:00 and 1:00. That's prime checkout time. That's when these people are busy. Next secret, he or she needs to be your best friend when you check in. Here's how to work this. Smile. No matter how horrible the trip in was. Don't ask for a free upgrade right away, especially when other people are within earshot. Instead, be specific. Would it be possible to get a room that's quiet? A room requewith a view? A room with a big bathroom? A room close to the elevator. After that, start working the freebies. Free breakfast. Free wi-fi. Free coupons for drinks at the bar. When it comes to things like wi-fi, parking or resort fees, it's easier for them to waive those at check-out. Hold off to get those freebies. You can probably roll your suitcase up to the room yourself. But tipping the bellboy to bring up your bag may be the best investment you can make. Here's why. If you get to your room and don't like it, who knows the best rooms in the whole hotel? This guy. Ask his advice. And call the front desk immediately to see if they can switch you. Once in the room, if you're feeling germphobic, call housekeeping. And ask for green blankets or a clean comforter to be brought up. These things don't get washed often. And finally, the number one thing I forget to bring on trips, a phone charger. And it's funny because the number one thing left behind in hotel rooms, are phone chargers. If you need one, call the front desk. And I'll bet you'll find the perfect cord to borrow. Resting comfortably in a good hotel room, becky worley, abc news, san francisco. Thank you for coming in. You risk negotiating over the cost of the room can work. It really can. It pays to phone the actual hotel. The online price, the online booking agency, often takes 30% commission from the hotel. If you call the manager directly and offer 20% less than the online price, you're both coming out ahead. And this works better with independent hotels than chains. The chains have less flexibility. It might make sense to make friends with the desk clerk and concierge when it comes to making reservations for dinner and things like that. The concierge take a kick-back from the tourist traps. If you want to know the local beat, ask the hotel clerk or the bellboy. Here's something I never would have thought of, at the end saying, I don't feel about paying for the wi-fi or the breakfast. Correspondent you have to have a reason? In this economy, everything is negotiable. In the case of breakfast, if they offer a hot buffet, and with your room you get a free continental breakfast, can i just have the hot buffet with my room. And the hotel clerks told "reader's digest," they rarely say no to that. You're almost certain to get it. Yeah. And on the wi-fi? As becky suggested, a smile help enormously. When you're checking in, they usually don't have the power to waive that fee. As you're checking out, and you go through the bill, they can delete that line. And if you've been nice during your stay, who knows? When we come back, "deals

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

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