Red Bull Stunt Man Felix Baumgartner: Death-Defying Skydive

Austrian skydiver set to break sound-barrier in Roswell, N.M.
3:00 | 10/14/12

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Transcript for Red Bull Stunt Man Felix Baumgartner: Death-Defying Skydive
Well, it's billed as the free fall from the edge of space. At this hour, felix baumgartner is preparing a death-defying sky dive. It will see him break the sound barrier. He plummeted to earth up to 70 miles an hour. He's ready to give it another go today. Ryan owens is in roswell, new mexico. How sit looking? Reporter: You know more than most how hard it is to get a body moving on a sunday morning. Think about going from 0 to 700 miles an hour in 35 seconds. That is what this daredevil is planning to try with a leap right into the record books. No airplane ever did what the xs-1 is about to do. Reporter:65 years to the day after test pilot chuck yeager broke the sound barrier, felix baumgartner is trying to do it with his body. He plans to jump from 23 miles above the new mexican desert. That's four times higher than most passenger planes fly. I like to be in the air. It's my second home. Reporter: Getting there has been a struggle. He's hitching a ride no the edge of space in a balloon that is 55 stories high. Winds of just two miles an hour and it can't launch. Whoa, gusty winds are taking that balloon down now. Reporter: That's what happened last week when felix tried to set the record. Abort due to gusty winds. Reporter: This morning, he's hoping to go for it again. You can hardly blame him for wanting to get it over with. He's trained for five years. Preparing his body for the stress and the real danger of falling farther, faster than any human has. When he steps off the capsule, there's virtually no air. He's in a vacuum. He has no control. If he steps off goofty, pushes harder with one foot, it could induce a turn. We could get into the flat spin. Reporter: There is so much that can go wrong, especially right after he jumps that his team has started calling that the 35 seconds of terror, which brings us to the real question of why would someone want to do this? They are hoping that scientists in the future will be able to design a better, stronger space suit for future astronauts, dan? Fair enough. I try to still avoid a project with anything that calls for 35 seconds of terror. Thank you, ryan. Moving on to a different

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

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