Report finds men are having fewer strokes, but women are not

Dr. Jennifer Ashton discusses the findings of a 15-year study that found the stroke rate for men had declined significantly, while it remained the same for women.
2:17 | 08/10/17

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Transcript for Report finds men are having fewer strokes, but women are not
strokes are on the decline for men but not for women and Dr. Ashton, you're here to help us. Good morning. Good morning to you. And even with the rates on decline for men of strokes that's going down for men, but it really overall hasn't really changed. What does this tell us. This was a huge study that appeared in the journal "Neurology" and looked at over a million people, 1.3 million over a 15-year period and look at the rates taking the pulse of what's going on, what are the numbers and found for men good news the rates of stroke are going down. For women, they stayed the same. So, again, we have to always track these major diseases and health outcomes because that's obviouy very clinically relevant. The natural question why is it going down for men and women staying the same. It's important to realize as a society we're not getting healthier, unfortunately. Although we are living slightly longer. So for both men and women, the things that increase the rates of stroke, high blood pressure, high cholesterol, diabetes, obesity, we see that again and again going up for everyone. For women they don't really understand what is really causing this change in stroke rates so, again, there are some possible theories here. Causes for women, heart disease which we know the number one killer of men and women, the same thing predisposes you for a risk of stroke. Less aggressive treatment possibly in women or women who may be more -- less compliant with their medications like blood pressure, lowering medications and then hormone therapy. We know there is a slight association between increased risk of stroke or clotting events in women who take hormones so, again, a lot of question, not a lot of conclusive answers at this point. What exactly could women do to cut their risk. I mean you have to ask first of all what causes a stroke and, remember, there's two different kind, a bleeding kind of stroke but the most common cause, ischemic where the blood supply gets cut off. When you talk about lowering that risk the same thing good for the heart is the brain, know your number, blood pressure, cholesterol, exercise. If you smoke, stop and know your family history so, again, prevention is very important. The good news is 80% of strokes are preventable That's great news and thank you. Like to end on a good note. Thank you for giving us that information and, George, we'll

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

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