Residents return to assess damage in Florida Keys

Residents returned to flattened homes and ruined neighborhoods after Hurricane Irma destroyed one out of every four homes across the Keys and as many as 65 percent of homes suffered major damage, according to FEMA.
2:44 | 09/13/17

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Transcript for Residents return to assess damage in Florida Keys
What an incredible night. So many people joining together to support those affected by hurricanes Harvey and Irma. They were right here in our little old studio and all across the country. Amazing to see thousands of you at home opening up your hearts and your wallets to help those in need and guess what, the hand in hand telethon has raised more than $44 million so far. The money is still coming in and the need is still so great. We're reminded of that this morning as storm victims across Florida and the southeast starting that long road to recovery. You know, gas is still in short supply across the state. Traffic backed up. You see it there as residents try to get home, and many are finding scenes of devastation like these from the Florida keys. The destruction is so widespread. Officials haven't been able to assess the total damage. ABC's Victor Oquendo is in islamorada, Florida, with more. Good morning, Victor. Reporter: Good morning, robin. I'm standing right in front of what's left of a three-story apartment complex leveled by hurricane Irma. You can look right inside these units. Once you get past the water you can see a bedroom on one side, there are the mattress, a living room, a couch. For this reason residents were told to evacuate. This morning, devastation across the Florida keys. I just -- I can't even believe it. Reporter: As residents are allowed to stream back into the ruins for the first time just beginning to assess all the damage. I didn't expect it to be this bad. Reporter: Homes completely flattened while others ripped off their foundation. It was how you didn't know if you were going to make it or not. Reporter: According to FEMA, Irma damaged or destroyed 90% of all the homes in the keys. From above islands lined with beachfront condos now scarred with shredded rooftops. Buildings reduced to rubble and mountains of debris where homes one stood. We'd spend time with my grandparents in this house. Reporter: Surveying the damage from the air you can see neighborhoods completely shredded. David Muir on the ground as they went home to home assessing the damage searching for casualties and survivors. People were trying to shelter in place in their homes. It just was not substantial for the type of weather that occurred here. Reporter: The Florida keys just 112 miles long, this morning officials only allowing people who evacuated into the first 33 miles. Residents growing frustrated. I have water, I have food. I have dogs and I can't get to my house. Reporter: It wasn't just the building destroyed. Take a look at the driveway. It completely collapsed. Very long few days here for everybody in the keys but we'd like to share this image with you, this rainbow that went above the Florida keys on Tuesday. George, it was a very welcome sight. Nice little sign of hope. Victor, thanks very much.

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

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