Robin Roberts, Sister-Sally Ann and Doctor on MDS Battle

Robin talks with her sister Sally-Ann and Dr. Gail Roboz about her treatment for myelodysplastic syndrome.
3:00 | 08/30/12

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Transcript for Robin Roberts, Sister-Sally Ann and Doctor on MDS Battle
But I'm going to focus on all these beautiful gifts. Sister sally, and my oncologist, dr. Gail roboz. You're on my turf now, gail. I'm usually on your turf. There's been so many questions asked. I want to start with sis first. It was tuesday and wednesday, you went through the collection process. Yes. And here you are on thursday. How are you feeling? I'm feeling just fine. I'm just -- my heart is with you right now. And it's also with all the people in my community who are going through -- in new orleans. Through isaac. And new orleans. And I am praying for all those who are suffer right now as a result of isaac. And I'm feeling so good, I'm going to be back on the air on saturday on my station. So, that's what people need to know. That the recovery time is so very quick. That, you know, I feel 100%. And the whole way you have been, you said there was no real discomfort in what you were doing. And I'm forever grateful. I'm forever grateful to see that. Gail, help people understand. I know when I first came to you, I'm looking at the heavens. What exactly is this and how does it happen. People can't say myelodysplastic syndrome, let alone say it. What is bone marrow? Bone marrow is the factory that makes your blood cells. And it can be damaged along the way. It can be damaged by chemotherapy that you got for something totally different. It can be damaged by radiation. Or sometimes it can be damaged by things we don't know what they are. We don't understand. I think the majority of mds patients out there, and watching this, are saying, how did I get this? I didn't do anything? I didn't get chemotherapy. Went through pretreatment with you. It was a mild form of chemotherapy. I didn't lose my hair or anything like that. And people remember, at the end of july, I had a really bad day on the air. With a clenched jaw. And to keep it real, I'm surprised it wasn't that difficult. But there are moments, gail. The type of chemotherapy you got, allows you to be here, looking fabulous, able to work. Not all chemotherapies let you do that. But you remember our conversations. You have to be careful. If you have a symptom that is new, you have to call us right away.It was nothing and that was great. But we check it out carefully. Everyone wants to know now. Everyone keeps talking about the first 100 days. And sergio, who will be doing the transplant at memorial sloan-kettering, says it's not a process. It's not surgery. This is a journey. Can you help people understand what's ahead? The first part when you get in the hospital, is a schedule. You'll have a calendar. There's going to be a special i.V. Put in. There's going to be a few days of chemo. And there's going to be a transplant that is infused through the special i.V. You wouldn't know we were doing anything if we didn't tell you. You can sleep through the whole thing. After that, the schedule gets let tight. It's all about you. And every patient is difference. We look at the first 30 days out as a chance to rebuild your system. We wiped out your bone marrow. We wiped out your immune system. But sally-ann's have to find a way in that catheter, swim around, figure out where to go and set up shop in you. So you get a functioning blood and immune system again. The first 100 days are really key. We're hoping the first 30 is when we're going to see a lot of that recovery happening. We're protecting you at that time. You're getting blood and antibiotics to protect your system until you're up and running again. There's some isolation. I'm not going to ask you when i can come back. You said, don't put a timetable on it. I'm going to get back as soon as I can. I love you, sister. I love you, sister. I'm going to be with you in the isolation area, wearing my mask. You and sergio and your treatment, you're a dream team. Randy: A suspect is in

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

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