On the Scene of the Wreckage of Malaysia Flight 17

ABC News' John Wendle says that "no one is in charge" at the debris field that spans 10 miles.
3:55 | 07/18/14

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Transcript for On the Scene of the Wreckage of Malaysia Flight 17
latest on our top story, the passenger jet shot down over Ukraine. That area is a large debris field stretching over ten miles. John Wendell is a freelance reporter for ABC news. He's there on the scene in Ukraine and I spoke to him on the phone just a few moments ago. John, I know you're back there today. You were also there yesterday shortly after all of this happened. How are the two scenes different from day to day? Reporter: I'm actually -- the rain is coming down pretty good and because of separatists checkposts and the condition of the roads we haven't been able to reach the main crash site, but we're about 12 kilometers away right now, and we just stumbled upon a -- it looks like the inside of a -- one of the baggage containers that they would put inside of the aircraft. So I mean to find that out here, there are no rebels out here. There's no Ukrainian emergency services. It -- you can actually see a trail of debris across this mown wheat field right now. It's -- I mean, to see this way out here in the middle of nowhere really is pretty shocking. I can only imagine so you're saying there appears to be no one in charge of anything right now. Reporter: No, there's a guy from a local -- from a village nearby kind of walking on the edge of this wheat field. I haven't heard anybody report about this, so I think that this really shows that it's going to take quite some time for them to gather together the pieces of wreckage. I do know that the rebels are -- have spent the entire day out in the fields around the main wreckage site, around the main crash site looking for bodies, so this is going to take some time. Particularly considering the political and security situation right now. It's of great concern that this site is not secure at all because as you're describing the materials, the things that you are seeing from the plane, this is key information. This is key evidence to prove what exactly did happen and where that missile was fired. Well, I'm not sure if it would be key evidence but it would definitely point to a path and you can actually hear artillery away in the background. So, you know, this is a very difficult circumstance right now to investigate what happened. I do know that they're looking in Washington and in Moscow at the various evidence but here on the ground, it's just going to take a lot of people and a lot of time trying to hunt down the different parts of the story. Again, you were one of the first on the scene there yesterday, right? Reporter: Yeah. And exactly what did you see then? Reporter: Well, I arrived around 10:00, 10:30 last night and there was still smoke and fire going pretty good and lots of guys -- lots of the armed rebels were along a small kind of country lane with small flashlights and that sort of thing. Trying to find bodies in the long grass on either side of the road. There's -- on one side, there's a wheat field and, you know, it's just -- I'm sorry to say it's just a surreal scene to be rolling through this peaceful countryside and then to come upon something like that was just utterly shocking. Even, even with all of the violence unfolding here in this region of Ukraine, it was still shocking. We can only imagine, only imagine what you are seeing right now. John wendle, thank you very much for your report. Reporter: Thank you.

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

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