Spotting depression on Instagram

Dr. Elizabeth Lombardo weighs in on how one study found that certain filters can suggest a likelihood of depression.
2:18 | 08/08/17

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Transcript for Spotting depression on Instagram
On today's big board an eye opening study about Instagram. Researchers at Harvard found it can help diagnose depression. It is not only the photos but the colors and clinical psychologist Dr. Elizabeth Lombardo is joining#us now. Dr. Lombardo, thanks for joining us. Tell us about the findings in the story. Yes, so what they did was looked at the accuracy of diagnosing depression and compared general practitioners with using an algorithm they developed using Instagram photos and found while general practitioners were able to correctly diagnose depression 42% of the time using the artificial intelligence they were 50% more accurate. Now, we have to remember these are general practitioners. They isn't psychologists for psychiatri psychiatrists. They aren't always focused on the mood. And might say see a specialist to follow up. We want to put up stock photos to give meme an idea what we're talking about. There were certain filters that suggest you're more or less likely to be depressed. Exactly. So first of all, people with who are healthier tend to use filters and tend to use like we see the Valencia filter which brings out the color. Now, you contrast that with people with depression who tend not to use a filter, they don't care about how they look and if they did use one it tended to be the inkwell which would take the colors out. I'm wondering about myself right now. Sometimes I use a filter and go with the black and white. I think it sometimes looks good. But they found there's a social aspect as well about the number of people in the photos. Exactly. So people who are depressed tended to have less number of faces in their photos. You know, when you think about depression, one of the cornerstone symptoms is social withdrawal so this could be indicative that they aren't spending as much time with their friends and family. Now, the result of this study are important just to remind us that depression can affect absolutely anyone so just keep an eye on our family, friends, even ourselves to see if these are happening in us. Great grist, doc. We appreciate is, Dr. Lombardo.

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

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