Possible Stroke Victim Rescued from South Pole

U.S. scientist Rene Douceur has been airlifted from her South Pole outpost.
2:33 | 10/17/11

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Transcript for Possible Stroke Victim Rescued from South Pole
The American scientists who may have suffered a stroke in the South Pole has been rescued from her isolated outpost. ABC's David Wright has the latest including an exclusive interview with the scientists when they do -- -- good morning David. Good morning -- just imagine being trapped for months even after suffering a traumatic mysterious brain injury at the very end of the earth that's the ordeal is finally coming to an end for this American researcher she's been waiting all winter long. Well today she finally got her ticket out. Precious cargo from the South Pole landing just a short while ago in Christ church New Zealand. Inside this plane a nuclear engineer from New Hampshire in urgent need of medical attention she's not home yet but definitely getting warmer. Renee Nicole dessert came out of -- customs looking tired but -- The flight over here I slept all the way so that put me on a cart and -- just. They gave me a little pill and that put me right out and I was trying -- show has been stranded at the South Pole for two months since she suffered what she believes was a stroke. The symptoms are. I had lost half my vision. And and that was with both sides. And it's come back now plus -- I have difficulty reading. Talking I tend to jumble words sometimes and make up new words getting out wasn't easy. The harsh Antarctic winter made rescue -- too dangerous. Any flight out would be dangerous for her because there's so thin that -- can't -- restaurant. Not ideal conditions. The personnel when aircraft which is on pressurized and so this increases the potential risk. To her only this week ended regular cargo flights resume and do serve hot dog the first one she emailed us this picture last night writing. Last picture inside my dorm room leaving now to go outside and wait for the plane to land. This -- airstrip was just the halfway point McMurdo Station and American research base the largest community in an -- -- which isn't saying much 3000. Miles but at last she gets to see her family and get the medical attention she needs. An outbreak and attacks. I'm. Hoping people to the botanical garden food. First order of business in New Zealand the cat scan and an MRI tomorrow morning. That brain scan will determine whether it's safer to fly straight on back to Johns Hopkins medical center for further treatment.

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

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