Student Wanted to See Whether 'GTA' Antics Were 'Fun in Real Life': Police

Police say Zachery Burgess went on a dangerous joy ride after playing a popular video game.
2:03 | 09/25/13

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Transcript for Student Wanted to See Whether 'GTA' Antics Were 'Fun in Real Life': Police
Now, a shocking story. A college student trying to play out one of the world's most popular and violent video games in real life. The young man stole a car and went on a spree straight out of grand theft auto. And abc's john muller has all of the details on that crime-filled night. Reporter: Police say zachary burgess, seen here in his booking photo, stole a pickup truck and went on a dangerous joyride in baton rouge. All because they say he failed to separate fantasy from reality. He had been playing the video game grand theft auto. And wanted to see if it was as fun in real life. Reporter: What happened next, sounds like a scene from that popular but controversial video game. Where characters rob, carjack and kill their way to the top of an urban underworld. Zachary sees a vehicle running in a parking lot. There's a female passenger inside the car. He jumps into the car. Reporter: Police allege in the process, burgess smashed into nine cars, sending two people to the hospital. He wouldn't speak to me. He was in the zone. Reporter: The woman eventually jumped out, before burgess allegedly slammed into this fence and into a wall. I sprinted out here. I watched him caught up on the brick wall here, spinning the tires. Reporter: Last year in albuquerque, an 11-year-old boy allegedly inspired by grand theft auto, stole his family's car. He would barely see over the wheel. Police were able to stop the vehicle before there was an accident. We're seeing cases of kids emulating the games because the games are so realistic. They want the sensation of the real experience in real-life. Reporter: The maker of grand theft auto did not return our request for comment. It's the latest version of the game that made history last week. Grossing $1 billion in the first three days of its release. This morning, burgess is out on bond, charged with stealing the car along with kidnapping and nine counts of hit and run. But unlike the video game, if found guilty, he faces the real prospect of jail. For "good morning america," john muller, abc news, new york.

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

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