New study finds babies who sleep alone by 4 months may sleep longer

A recent study from Penn State challenges the recommendation from the American Academy of Pediatrics that infants sleep in the same room as their parents, on a separate surface, until age 1 to decrease the risk of SIDS.
4:04 | 06/06/17

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Transcript for New study finds babies who sleep alone by 4 months may sleep longer
We are back now with a new study about getting your baby to sleep through the night. Something every parent wants and the scene from "Nine months" you can see something key to its findings. The baby is sleeping in his own room. That's exactly what the study said is the right thing to did and our senior medical contributor Dr. Jennifer Ashton is here. Welcome, doc. Thank you, sir. You know, doc -- give it up for doc, everybody. This goes against American academy of period at trigs. What they're saying now it goes against everything they recommend. Exactly but with this story there's really a story behind the story. So this was a study down out of Penn state and did find babies under a year of age slept longer duration up to about 49, 50 minutes longer if they were placed in their own room. Now, the story behind the story really has to do with three other issues which are not hearing people talk about and they're really important. Number one, the issue of breast-feeding. Number two the issue of reducing the risk of sudden infant death syndrome or sids and establishes early and good healthy sleep patterns which we know is important because poor sleep has a link to obesity so that's why the controversy started, Michael, the American academy of pediatrics was looking at ways to reduce sid, way to increase breast-feeding and their studies came to different conclusions, some of which were not what we call evidence based. So, look, I think controversy and science and medicine is a good thing. I think we do well when we question and challenge each other and this is a perfect example of that. You mentioned breast feeding and sids. What are the key sleeping issues when it comes to those. Sids is a real issue and affects over 3,000 babies in this country every year. We don't totally understand what causes it but do know there are certain important sleeping behaviors that parents need to be aware of in terms of reducing the risk, number one, babies should never sleep on soft surfaces or in the same bed as their parents. They can be smothered, crushed. Should be put to sleep on their back. Back to sleep. That's the way to remind even though our mothers will say I put you on your tummy. They need to go to sleep on their back and no soft pillows or blankets in the vicinity. That is really, really important. Whether or not they have a reduced Rick of sids sleeping in the same room or by themself, the verdict is still out. A lot of parents, okay, I want to bond with my child. What about bonding? Listen, you know, I don't think bonding follows a floor plan and some global perspective here, you know, in other parts of the world we don't have the luxury of having a different room for every person in the family, right? The entire family is sleeping in the same room and oftentimes the same bed so I think it's important, you know, parents have to figure out what works for them. I had two children, one slept alone in their own room from 11 weeks of age, one just got out of the bed around 14, 15. I think by college most people are able to sleep by themselves, what went on in yours. 14 or 15 years old? We're going to have to do another study just on you. You know what, I think everyone has their own opinion whether or not you're breast-feeding or not, I mean, parents need their rest, parents need to bond also. But I don't think whether your child sleep as lone or with you is going to make or break the whole bonding. What did you guys do? My oldest daughter I would sleep in the bed and she had her crib next and I would have my hand through the crib the whole night. That's a big hand. Yes. And then when why son was in the crib by himself, the twins had their own room and it was like, ok okay, put them down and daddy is going to bed. It worked out. They're all great kids but I would never sleep with them in the bed with me. I felt afraid to roll over. I think we need a lot more data to tease out these issues about breast-feeding sids, obesity, sleep quality because the babies in this study slept longer it doesn't mean they necessarily slept better. Yeah. Doc, thank you so much. I'm going back to sleep. 14 or 15, huh. I can't get that out of my mind. All right. Thank you to Dr. Jennifer

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

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