Superstorm Sandy Storm Surge in New York City

Chris Cuomo reports on the aftermath of the storm in the Big Apple.
3:00 | 10/30/12

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Transcript for Superstorm Sandy Storm Surge in New York City
Chris cuomo joins me. We were out all night long in this storm. Trapped right here. Couldn't go anywhere. We've been talking about expectations. There's the question of what you expect. And then, there's what you can handle. The water came. The surge came. We look at some of the pictures. We couldn't have imagined. This is the path. The path train entrance. The water is going down. The battery tunnel became like a waterfall. For all of the preparations and everything that people were preparing for, it happened as predicted. But it hit the city in more and worse ways than we could have ever prepared for. The city that never sleeps, now crippled. Without power. Much of it underwater. The brooklyn battery tunnel, a main entry point for the city, a rushing waterfall. Sandy's surge into lower manhattan for hours. Up to 15 feet in the tunnels. Blown by hurricane-force gusts that did their worst. Trees, power lines, torn and tossed. The scenes like this began. One of the city's transformed, buffeted by 90-mile-per-hour winds and salty water. An atomic-looking explosion. 650,000 in the city in darkness. Millions more suffered the same in areas. Water stood four to eight feet deep in the subway tunnels. We've got all of our resources ready to clean this up. Reporter: People here could be without power for days. The subways could be quiet for weeks. The financial heart of the country, barely beating as floodwaters surrounded wall street, closing the new york stock exchange again today. Officials are scrambling to find a way for trading to resume. We've found ourselves stuck on an island within an island. As darkness fell, sandy's waters moved with deceptive quickness. Within an hour, raw sewage marooned many in the battery area of manhattan. This is a lake. We were stopped by a haunting image. It's a sad symbol. We need to get that light back on. It's freedom tower. There's something you can't see in the pictures and you can't hear in the sound that many people are feeling here in the city. We should talk about it. I haven't had aling like i had in this city, since 9/11. The queasy sense of foreboding. I was trapped in the same place as we were last night. But this morning when we woke up, the water was gone. And for all of the power out and the property damage and the human loss that is still to come, this can be fixed. And when people wake up this morning in new york city and the surrounding areas, we're going to get through this. We've been through much worse. And there's a team of people working to get it fixed this morning. By the way, sandy, that nor'easter with the hurricane in the center, delivered on its title, a superstorm, with the lowest central pressure as it came onshore. The lowest pressure of any storm

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

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