Tennis Referee Passes Lie Detector Test: Should Police Conduct One?

Dan Abrams and Nancy Grace discuss the murder charges against the U.S. Open ref.
3:00 | 10/10/12

Coming up in the next {{countdown}} {{countdownlbl}}

Coming up next:

{{nextVideo.title}}

{{nextVideo.description}}

Skip to this video now

Now Playing:

{{currentVideo.title}}

More information on this video
Enhanced full screen
Explore related content
Comments
Related Extras
Related Videos
Video Transcript
Transcript for Tennis Referee Passes Lie Detector Test: Should Police Conduct One?
spoke to the man who is supposed to be her lover. And he has denied it. Nancy grace is in atlanta. Here with me, dan abrams. Dan, let me begin with you. A lie detector test, as i understand it, isn't admissible in court. Lie director tests are used in the process of investigations. Her lawyer probably said to her, don't take a lie detector for now because he didn't know what the result might be. We're going to do our own lie detector, do someone that's unassailable to do it. Someone that literally led the fbi polygraph unit. Now, they're saying this means a lot. The fact that she's passed this lie detector test. I don't think that the authorities will be swayed. But I think it's a significant piece of evidence. Nancy, if you were the prosecutor, what would you say to it? Well, I happen to know the man that administered the polygraph is jack trimarco. I know him very, very well. And I appreciate the lie detector results that he told us about. I appreciate the statement that the defense made, the p.R. Effort that they have made. But this is my concern. My concern is the evidence. And also, I don't believe that there was an affair. And I don't even want to talk about that o conjecture about it because that only drags down her reputation. That's not what this is about. This is about the physical evidence. There are nine blows to the right side of the head only. The shards of the coffee cup are still in his head. There is blood, inconsistent with a fall. There is blood down the stairs. Blood on his bed where she found him. There's blood at the fridge. What did he do? Beat himself in the head with a coffee cup and have a snack? There's blood in the linen closet. And blood going to the garage. This is not a fall. The question is, what is the evidence, though, that she did it? There's no question there's evidence that poses questions here. But I think they have a real problem here in terms of the direct evidence that she's responsible as opposed to someone might have been responsible. Well, there's a c for that. There's forced entry. The alarm didn't go off. Nothing was n from the home. She finds the body. Immediately, if there had been any drama to her hands, immediately goes out for a manicure. This is unusual, in all respects. But she first said that he had a heart attack. That would have been revealed in the autopsy. What I'm saying is, look. This, by all accounts, is a sweet, little, old lady. But the evidence doesn't match up. Dan, there is enough evidence there to at least give the prosecutors pause about dismissing the case. Yeah. I don't expect that the prosecutors are necessarily going to come forward and dismiss the case. But I would be stunned, based on the evidence that I've seen, that they were able to get a conviction, based on the evidence we know of. There are questions here. There are unanswered questions. But put together the fact that there's not a lot of evidence and now the fact that she's passed a polygraph test. And I will tell you, I'll bet you that the prosecutors are getting very nervous. You know what? That's great.

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

{"id":17441015,"title":"Tennis Referee Passes Lie Detector Test: Should Police Conduct One?","duration":"3:00","description":"Dan Abrams and Nancy Grace discuss the murder charges against the U.S. Open ref.","section":"GMA","mediaType":"Default"}