10 Baffling Medical Conditions

Mehta recalled meeting Gayle in February to discuss her condition. When Gayle's mother played '"Temperature" on an MP3 player for her daughter to hear, a music-induced seizure followed.

"It was amazing to me," said Mehta. "We got a seizure when we put her music on."

Brain researchers believe such seizures can occur when the part of the brain that processes emotions associated with a certain type of music overlap with areas of the brain that trigger seizures.

About 70 percent of people with epilepsy are able to control their seizures through medication. For those who still have seizures or cannot handle the side effects of the medication, doctors consider brain surgery.

"We did try a number of different anti-seizure medications, but it was clear that her epilepsy was not responding," said Dr. Alan Ettinger, chief of the epilepsy center at Long Island Jewish Medical Center. "In her case, in addition to music setting off the epilepsy, even the very thought of the song started to provoke the seizures."

The Girl Who Feels No Pain

While pain is a sensation that few of us relish, the absence of it can be tremendously hazardous. And for a young child, the lack of ability to feel pain can be especially dangerous.

Such is the case with 8-year-old Gabby Gingras, whose parents recently learned that she had a rare condition known as hereditary sensory autonomic neuropathy, or HSAN for short.

"I was massaging Gabby's gums one day, and she bit down on me ungodly hard. It was so hard, I couldn't stand it," Gabby's father, Steve Gingras, told ABC News' Primetime. "When I pulled my finger out, I pulled a tooth out of her mouth -- and she's just happy playing like nothing happened."

Gabby's lack of pain sensation eventually led to the loss of all of her teeth. A badly scratched cornea forced doctors to remove her left eye, and she now wears a helmet and goggles every day to protect herself from serious injury.

In Gabby's case, the condition arose from a genetic accident that stunted the development of nerve fibers crucial in the detection of pain and temperature.

As children with this condition get older, the hazards associated with never knowing the sensation of pain persist. However, a number of people have lived into adulthood with the condition.

Gabby's parents have started a foundation called Gift of Pain, a support group for people with HSAN. So far they have found 39 people who think they have the condition.

"I don't want another mother to ever sit where Steve and I sat five or six years ago and say, 'what is going on? Why can't I get help? Why can't I get information?'" Trish Gingras, Gabby's mother, told "Primetime." "That's really what motivates me."

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