Born Without Eyes and Ultrasound Couldn't See

As ultrasounds for women seeking prenatal care have become almost universal in the United States and, as Evans argued, perhaps overly reassuring, doctors also say that the prenatal imaging has evolved into high tech and low tech uses.

Now, a portion of obstetricians have become experts in using prenatal imaging to diagnose genetic disorders an ultrasound wouldn't have caught a generation ago.

"What you can see in prenatal imaging is changing enormously," Watson said. "You end up with two different kinds of people who do imaging. One level is the standard obstetrician on the corner, who can do the basic measurements and tell you if your baby is growing normally and you end up with a picture on your fridge."

Not Every Obstetrician is An Expert in Prenatal Imaging

The other, Watson said, are people who specialize in high-risk pregnancies and can use ultrasounds to diagnose, or even treat more and more genetic abnormalities.

"At the first level it's a matter of someone being suspicious that something is going on," Watson said. "The patient can then go to an obstetrician who specializes in high risk pregnancies."

Doctors can even treat a few of the birth defects in the womb -- such as Spina bifida or twin to twin transfusion syndrome -- if ultrasounds pick up on the disorder, Watson said.

Using Ultrasound to Find Red Flags for Genetic Disorders

Evans said ultrasounds today can even raise red flags for Down syndrome, although the condition is not treated in the womb, and alert a woman that she might need genetic screening.

"There are certain markers on ultrasound that change the odds (of a genetic disorder), for example the nuchal translucency, which is thickness of the back of the neck in the first trimester, can be a marker for Down syndrome," said Evans.

Garrison said she chose to go to the public with her story because, her family had never heard about Brielle's disorder, unlike Down syndrome or other more well known conditions.

"It's just so rare, most people don't know that it really exists," said Garrison "If more people know about it, then it's more likely people will study it."

For the next few years, Brielle will have to see doctors for conformers -- balls filled with hydrogels to increase the size of her eye sockets -- in order for her facial structure to grow normally.

Fay says he and his colleagues at Massachusetts Eye and Ear are continually looking for new ways to help children with the condition grow as normally as possible before they receive prosthetic eyes.

Since speaking with ABC News affiliate WPBF in West Palm Beach, Fla., Garrison said parents of children with anophthalmia or microphthalmia have contacted her seeking support.

"A lot of worse things could have happened and thank god they didn't," Garrison said. "I see her just as any other baby. She does everything any other baby would."

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