Teens' Lung Health Is Linked to Their Diet

  • Having fresh fruit available and visible for snacking.
  • Adding dried fruit to whole-grain muffins, trail mix and the like.
  • Making smoothies with fresh or frozen fruit and milk or yogurt.
  • Adding single-serving fruit cups or applesauce to lunches.
  • Serving 100 percent fruit juice (with no added sugar).
  • Having chutney as a side dish at dinner.
  • Puréeing cooked vegetables into red sauces.
  • Baking quick bread or muffins with shredded zucchini or carrots.
  • Offering cut veggies (or baby carrots) for dipping in a low-fat creamy dressing.
  • Sneaking finely grated vegetables into meatloaf or hamburgers.
  • Serving vegetable juice.
  • And to boost omega-3 dietary intake, you can add walnuts and eggs enriched with omega-3 if your teen is not a fish lover.

    SOURCES: Jane S. Burns, Sc.D., research associate, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston; Christine Karpinski, M.A., R.D., L.D.N., C.S.S.D., board-certified specialist, sports nutrition, Nutrition Edge Inc., West Chester, Pa.; TeensHealth, Nemours Foundation; U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

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