As Teens Plug In, Parents Fret

  • At rock concerts, use protective gear. University of Minnesota researchers tested 29 concertgoers before and after they attended three concerts, sitting in a range of locations from the stage. Sound levels exceeded all occupational safety levels, no matter where the seat was.
  • Be sure teens have an idea of how loud is too loud. Tunkel suggests a simple test: If others can hear the music when a teen is listening with headphones or earbuds, the music is way too loud.
  • Point out musicians who are role models. Many musicians take pains to protect their hearing. "Parents should point that out," Bothwell said.
  • More information

    The American Academy of Otolaryngology--Head and Neck Surgery has more on noise-induced hearing loss in children.

    SOURCES: Marcella Bothwell, M.D., pediatric otolaryngologist/head and neck surgeon, Rady Children's Hospital, San Diego; David Tunkel, M.D., chief, pediatric otolaryngology, Johns Hopkins Children's Center, Baltimore; survey, American Academy of Otolaryngology--Head and Neck Surgery, May 2009; April 2006, Otolaryngology--Head and Neck Surgery; American Academy of Otolaryngology--Head and Neck Surgery (www.entnet.org); U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (www.cdc.gov)

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