McCain Vote Might Mean Low Testosterone Later

"This is evidence showing that social events in our lives do affect our physiology, and it can happen quite quickly," he said.

However, Dr. Abraham Morgentaler author of "Testosterone for Life," said research linking testosterone to moods isn't as solid as doctors would like, and the saliva test for testosterone itself isn't well studied or validated.

"What we have is an association -- it's hard to know what that means for people, did it [testosterone] go down because the men were upset and disappointed, or is it totally unrelated?" asked Morgentaler, who is also an associate clinical professor of urology at Harvard Medical School.

Morgentaler said despite the inability to prove cause and effect in the study, overall doctors are seeing more evidence that testosterone is linked to men's moods.

Stanton added that the drop in testosterone his study mimicked the same hormone fluctuations found in most male mammals after they lose a physical fight.

Testosterone and Competition in Nature

"For men or male mammals, or males of a variety of species -- if you win, typically, testosterone goes up and if you lose testosterone goes down," Stanton said.

Scientists hypothesize that the rise in testosterone motivates the winner to keep fighting and establish more dominance, thereby getting more access to food, territory or even potential mates.

The loser, however, typically leaves the scene of the competition.

"All things considered that's pretty smart, you just lost and it's probably not going to be for your benefit to fight again -- especially if you might be injured," he said.

Whether these basic animal instincts can be correlated to people in a complex world of politics and democracy remains to be seen, but at least some people who voted for McCain felt as if they wanted to walk away on election night.

Feeling Disconnected After Election Night

"I felt somewhat disconnected from America after the election. At least I have about 45 percent of America still with me," wrote Doug Johnson of Plainfield, Ind.

Johnson voted for McCain in 2008, and felt a little fed up at the end of election night.

"I felt a little secluded. I didn't even want to watch any of the programs. I didn't want to watch any of the glory-seeking politicians before Obama spoke," he said. "I just kind of turned the TV off -- it's almost like the NFL guy goes and slams the football down and I just don't want to see it."

Interestingly enough, a sports event is the next area Stanton would like to study as a vicarious battlefield for spectators' testosterone levels: a college basketball game between traditional rivals Duke University and the University of North Carolina.

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