G-Spot Study: Erogenous or Erroneous Zone?

Whipple was critical of British researchers who did not consider digital stimulation -- the easiest way to achieve G-spot orgasm -- only vaginal intercourse and clitoral stimulation.

For that reason, scientists did not include lesbian women in their study.

Nor were subjects asked about sexual positions: woman on top and rear entry bring more stimulus to the anterior wall of the vagina than the so-called missionary position.

"They didn't ask what type of intercourse and would have different results," said Whipple, now a professor emerita at New Jersey's Rutgers University.

Study researcher Andrea Burri, a clinical psychologist and genetic epidemiologist, admits that even though scientists could not find a "genetic influence" for the G-spot, the study was not conclusive.

New G-Spot Research Needed

"It has to be replicated and we need more refined methodology," Burri told ABCNews.com. Twins may have been influenced by "environmental factors" like partner differences, relationship satisfaction and mood.

She argued that this new research would take the pressure off women who felt "inadequate" because they could not find a G-spot.

But Whipple insists her research was not intended to make women "goal strive."

"My whole thing has been to validate women to help them feel good whatever brings them sexual pleasure," she said.

Such is the case with Mitzi Rae, author and publisher of the Web site Shed Your Inhibitions who has spent $2,000 on courses at Cadell's Loveology University and hopes to coach others.

"There is a radical difference between the G-spot and any other orgasm," Rae, a 44-year-old from Shenandoah, Va., told ABCNews.com. "It's something you can't get from touching any part of the body. It's got to be the right area and there is no mistaking it."

Meanwhile, Tamara Bell makes a living helping women getting it right. She sells the We-Vibe, a C-shaped high-grade silicon device that fits in the vagina and provides clitoral and G-spot stimulation with a waving motion.

Bell runs a Sacramento business selling sex toys to women in the privacy of their homes.

At 48, Bell is founder of the Home Pleasure Party Plan Association and is convinced every woman is capable of a powerful G-spot orgasm if she learns to do it correctly.

Still, experts are unclear on whether every woman has a G-spot.

"Even the study said 56 percent of women have some feeling in that area," said Susan Quilliam, author of the revised Joy of Sex. "So it's really a case of science versus women's experience."

"As an advice columnist, I would say if you don't have one, that's fine -- you have plenty of other ways to get pleasure," she told ABCNews.com.

"If you do have one, don't make a list of people who don't. Every woman has her own sexuality and hot spots and therefore the important thing is to find out what gives you pleasure."

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