Top 5 Ways College Kids Will Get Swine Flu

For more information about swine flu symptoms, treatment and prevention, check out the ABC News OnCall+ Swine Flu Center.

"Hand washing is only useful because we want to stop you from touching your face with your inoculated hands or touching someone else with them," said Horovitz. "But washing your hands periodically does nothing if you then go and touch yourself or someone else right away."

Students can carry a personal bottle of antibacterial hand sanitizer as well as disinfectant cloths to wipe down surfaces throughout the day, suggests Horowitz.

"A simple wipe down of the desk with a wet cloth is a very easy way to disinfect and protect yourself," he said.

DRINKING GAMES

For some students, drinking with their friends can be just as virus-prone as sitting at those germ-ridden classroom desks.

"You don't want to share utensils or drinking glasses when you've had direct saliva on them," said Horovitz. "Refrain from drinking games or just keep your own cup."

Tierno says that there is some truth to the fact that alcohol – even the type you drink – will kill germs, but only when the drink is pure liquor. Beer and wine won't kill off enough of the germs to make it safe to share cups.

For more information about swine flu symptoms, treatment and prevention, check out the ABC News OnCall+ Swine Flu Center.

"Lay off the drinking games if others are involved," said Tierno. "If you want to drink, drink on your own."

CAMPUS DINING HALLS

College students might want to think again before taking a heaping helping of food from a communal source like a salad bar.

"All people eating in cafeterias should not taste directly from the public trough, they should put things on their plate first," said Horovitz. "Hands should be washed and they should not share food or utensils with friends."

For more information about swine flu symptoms, treatment and prevention, check out the ABC News OnCall+ Swine Flu Center.

It would behoove students to also be diligent about wiping down surfaces that many other people touch – such as vending machine buttons – to prevent themselves from contracting viruses such as the swine flu.

"ATM machines, computers or whatever things are used by multiple people is what transfers a virus," said Teirno.

KISSING

Close contact of the sexual kind is at the top of many college students' favorite pastimes.

And, sure enough, the sex lives of university students is going to be yet another contributing factor to the spread of swine flu as the school year progresses.

Earlier this month the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention advised students to wear surgical masks before kissing another person, a recommendation Horovitz deems "unrealistic."

For more information about swine flu symptoms, treatment and prevention, check out the ABC News OnCall+ Swine Flu Center.

"Kissing with masks isn't going to happen," said Horovitz. "Just wash your hands before you touch someone else and if you're going to have sex and share saliva, be careful."

Teirno said just being aware of the people you interact with and how they're feeling is a good way to protect yourself from getting sick too, or at least a good way to determine who you shouldn't swap spit with.

"If you're ill, don't do," said Teirno of kissing. "If you see someone who is overtly manifest with symptoms like coughing, running nose, weeping eyes and is obviously ill, stay away."

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