Irish Family Seeks Help From America for Their Dying Children

Photo: Irish Family Seeks Help From America for Their Dying Children: Rare, Deadly Battens Disease Threatens One Couples Young Children

After both their children were diagnosed with a fatal disease, a husband and wife living in County Kerry, have begun fundraising to bring their babies to the United States for clinical trials that just may save their lives.

"If we don't do this our children will die," Tony Heffernan told the Irish Voice from his home in Keel, Co. Kerry on Monday.

Heffernan, 38, is the proud father of 4-year-old Saoirse and 22-month-old Liam.

Both children have a rare disease called Late Infantile Neuronal Ceroid Lipofuscinosis (LINCL), or Batten's Disease, that will eventually end their lives if a cure isn't found.

Heffernan and his wife Mary, 34, were elated when their first child was born. Saoirse was the light in their day.

While Heffernan, a ships captain by trade who currently works with Hoegh shipping enterprise, and his wife, a stay at home mom, were enjoying the endless pleasures that came with having a daughter, they became worried in January 2009 when Saoirse started having seizures.

Doctors put it down to epilepsy. All the symptoms pointed in that direction.

However, Saoirse's seizures became more aggressive, finally resulting in her suffering up to 200 a day. A trip to specialists in Dublin was a must.

"We were referred to Temple Street Hospital in Dublin last March. We just couldn't control the seizures. They got progressively worse and worse," recalls Heffernan.

Endless tests still reveled epilepsy. The Heffernans were satisfied and Saoirse began a course of treatments to help her little body deal with it. In August she was called for an MRI in Dublin.

"Doctors told us if anything serious showed up in the MRI that they would call us immediately. If not they said it would be two to three weeks before we heard anything and they would contact our doctor here in Kerry directly," explains Heffernan.

As the phone was silent for three weeks, the Heffernan's were satisfied the diagnosis was still epilepsy.

However their lives were about to be turned upside down the weekend of the All-Ireland football final.

"We were all getting excited for the big game, I'm from Cork and Mary is from Kerry so as you can imagine the jokes were flying," remembers Heffernan.

Then came the call.

The Friday before the football final, September 25, the hospital in Dublin called to say it was imperative for Saoirse and her parents to be in Dublin Monday morning for further testing and a proper diagnosis.

"As Kerry was playing Cork in Croke Park we were checking into a hotel in Dublin waiting for our appointment on Monday with our daughter," he said.

The following morning the Heffernans were asked to bring Saoirse to Beaumont Hospital, an academic teaching hospital in Dublin city, to meet with a group of Irish neurologists who were visiting that day.

"They said they wanted a fresh pair of eyes to look at Saoirse. I never expected the outcome," said Heffernan sadly.

During the consultation with the neurologists, Heffernan overheard the doctor's conversations.

"I heard one doctor mention Saoirse's name and this thing called Batten's Disease in the same sentence," he said.

Not familiar with the term, Heffernan began to Google its meaning. His heart began to rip from his chest slowly as he read what was before him.

Batten's Disease is a rare neurological disorder that begins in childhood. It is always fatal.

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