Haiti Relief: Caravans of Injured Are Leaving Capital

Partners in Health is also diverting the less-critically injured to the central plateau region. VanWassenhove said the mayor of the town Hinche, already organized a caravan of three busses to transport people out of the capital.

"But some of the more pressing needs of people on the ground is anything solar -- flashlights, radios -- and tents, water, or water purification tools," she said.

Experts in disaster medicine estimate people can survive buried in rubble for a few days at most.

A February 2006 article in the journal Prehospital and Disaster Medicine estimates rescue workers can find "numerous survivors beyond 48 hours of entrapment under rubble, with a few successfully enduring entrapment of 13–14 days."

As Haitians race against the clock to find people in the rubble, organizations like Partners in Health are bracing themselves for long-term health problems after the disaster -- including malnutrition.

Hope Within Haiti

The nonprofit Meds and Food for Kids -- an organization that manufactures food for malnourished children -- was delighted to find its manufacturing plant, staff and warehouse in Haiti had withstood the earthquake.

Meds and Food for Kids has distributed "Medika Mamba" to children suffering from malnutrition in Haiti for several years.

"It's peanut butter, it's milk powder, sugar, vegetable oil, vitamins and minerals mixed all together to create a super food," said Tom Stehl, operations coordinator of Meds and Food for Kids.

Stehl said on a "good day," one out of every four children in Haiti, about 250,000 children, suffer from malnutrition. Stehl expects those numbers to grow as families are pushed to the brink of survival after the earthquake.

But Stehl said the manufacturing plant in Cap Hatien in the north of Haiti survived the quake intact, as did the distributing warehouse in Port-au-Prince.

"In Port-au-Prince, we have five metric tons of this stuff. This is energy dense. This is super food. This is not rice, this is not grain," said Stehl.

Six pounds of Medika Mamba will feed one child for two weeks, according to Stehl. From that calculation, the current warehouse stock in Port-au-Prince will feed just under 2,000 malnourished children for two weeks.

"We're ramping up production. We're making more and more of this stuff and we're making it available to those who need it," Stehl said.

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