From Age 2 to 7: Why Are Children Smoking in Indonesia?

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Can Children Quit Smoking?

Referring to the tobacco companies, she said: "I just don't like them, but… I don't talk loudly about this. If I push too hard then I will get a strong reaction."

Dr. Endang cited a troubling statistic: "I can say sadly that children aged 10 to 14 who start smoking is actually rising from 2007 to 2010."

And then there is that famous "smoking baby." His name is Aldi Rizal and he is now a chubby four-year-old who lives in rural Sumatra with his family in a one-room hut.

After the video aired, embarrassed local health officials set him to rehab in Indonesdia's capital, Jakarta. Now, Aldi's mother says he is no longer smoking. At least for now, she told "20/20."

"If I don't buy him toys, he threatens to start smoking again," said his mother.

Aldi promised not to smoke, though his mother said she caught him with a cigarette recently because people in town offer them to him when he visits.

But living in this environment, where cigarette companies have such free rein to transmit their message, quitting for the children of Indonesia may be easier said than done.

ABC News teamed with the Center for Public Integrity's International Consortium of Investigative Journalists (ICIJ) in reporting on the tobacco industry in Indonesia. This week, ICIJ released a report on the barriers to passing tougher anti-tobacco legislation in Indonesia.

Philip Morris International is the leading international tobacco company, with tobacco products sold in approximately 180 countries. In 2010, PMI captured an estimated 16 percent share of the total international cigarette market outside of the U.S., excluding China. In 2010, Philip Morris International reported worldwide revenues of $27 billion and an operating income of $11.2 billion, according to the company's annual report. PMI spends more than $200 million marketing in Indonesia, and overall sales have increased by 25 percent in the last decade. For more information about smoking in Indonesia and Philip Morris International visit these websites:

http://www.tobaccofreekids.org/

http://www.pmi.com

http://www.seatca.org/

Watch the full story on "20/20" online.

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