Surgically Implanted Eyeball Jewelry Is the New Piercing

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"Tell these people I'm not going to lose my eyeball," Luckayanko said.

"It's not possible," Chynn said. "My life would be better if people listened to me."

Chynn said based on his experience, he believes the procedure is quite safe and said it was not unlike one of the countless off-label uses in which doctors "perform procedures or use medications that are not formally approved by the FDA for that purpose or indication."

Upstairs, patients sit wearing blue surgical bonnets and foot covers in a small waiting room with paper lanterns and velvety curtains. Their chairs were arranged around a large, flat-screen television filled with a real-time eyeball on it as Chynn performed his laser eye surgeries. The sound of the laser fills the waiting room with noises that resemble something between an old-fashioned toy gun and the Wheel of Fortune hitting the plastic rungs as it spins.

Luckayanko said she likes the eye jewelry because it's "elegant" and only visible to the people she wants to be close to. She said she didn't have any tattoos because she didn't like that they're permanent. The eye jewelry is removable.

"Don't take a steak knife and remove it yourself," Chynn said.

But it hasn't been all positive attention for Luckayanko since a post-op photo of her eyeball went viral and commenters started criticizing her for getting the implant.

"I figure out I need plastic surgery," she said with a hint of sarcasm about what commenters have said about her. "I feel they can say whatever."

Luckayanko said she came to the United States five years ago and hopes to become a famous graphic designer. She said the negative attention she received this month made her empathize with Kim Kardashian. When she feels down, she said she watches Miley Cyrus videos to remind herself that Cyrus is still happy despite the backlash from Cyrus' twerking and other scandalous behavior.

"What did she do?" Chynn asked the group.

"She kept on doing it," Elnicklawy said.

Editor's Note: This story has been revised to reflect the fact that scissors, not a laser, were used in the procedure to insert the eyeball jewelry. The article also has been amended to clarify details about Dr. Chynn's past, and his statement about the safety of the procedure has been added.

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