'Misty Series' Haunts Girl Long After Rape

Amy first became aware of the photos in 2005, when she began receiving victim notifications from government - now up to 850 in all - which were mandated by the 1984 Victims of Crime Act.

Each time a pedophile was prosecuted for downloading her images, a letter would arrive at her home, and she would relive the abuse.

Amy's uncle bought her gifts and let her ride his motorcycle. Now, distrusting, she shuns the generosity of others and fears getting a driver's license. "I will never ride a motorcycle again," she wrote.

Amy failed a high school anatomy class because of the disgust she felt at the human body. She is unable to trust others and says she sometimes "drinks too much" to hide her feelings of shame.

After the abuse her uncle would give her beef jerky, once a favorite snack, but now it evokes "feelings of panic, guilt," she said. "It's like I can never get away from what happened to me."

All this Amy described in the victim-impact statement Marsh urged her to write. He also hired a psychologist and estimated damages, based on costs of counseling, lost wages and lawyers fees, came to $3,467,854. Marsh said they will not stop seeking restitution until that sum is reached.

For years, authorities could not seek restitution because victims could not be identified.

But in 2009, The Center for Missing and Exploited Children was able to identify a girl they called "Amy" among 150 digital images that had been seized by Texas police in the case of a 43-year-old Dyle Randall Paroline.

They say that in that year alone, the Misty series was viewed by more than 8,800, showing Amy forced to perform "extremely graphic" acts, including oral sex, anal penetration and masturbation with an adult man.

Federal prosecutors sought $3.4 million restitution from Paroline, who pled guilty to possessing the photos, but U.S. Judge Leonard Davis said in an 18-page opinion that was too much, violating the Eighth Amendment's prohibition on excessive punishments. In a similar case in Maine, the judge agreed.

But Amy had already been successful in several cases. The first award of $200,000 came from a Connecticut judge in the conviction of Alan Hesketh, a British executive who had more than 1,000 images of child pornography, including some from the "Misty Series."

And in two separate cases in Florida, judges have ordered the defendants to pay Amy nearly $3.3 million and $3.7 million, and in California, a judge ordered $50,000 in restitution.

"The healing process is hard enough without 800 reminders coming in the mail constantly, knowing that other people knew what happened to you," said Jennifer Wilson Marsh, who is hotline director for The Rape, Abuse & Incest National Network, the nation's largest anti-sexual assault organization. "The shame is amplified."

But Wilson Marsh, who is no relation to Amy's lawyer, wonders how restitution will stop these heinous crimes.

"A lot of perpetrators find their way around the law," she told ABCNews.com. "It's really hard to put a monetary value on trauma."

One San Diego woman who was raped then photographed while interviewing for a job at the age of 21, said Amy's pain can't be erased with restitution.

"No money can cover what happened," said Aliza Amar, now a 49-year old activist for RAINN. "No money can take the shame away."

And others say punishing those who only download pornography in this way is too harsh.

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