Donna Svennevik/ABC News
  • Guatemala Slideshow

    ABC News Anchor Christiane Amanpour traveled to Cajagualten, Guatemala, to report on what the U.S. government deems the most serious health problem – malnutrition. In fact, chronic malnutrition is said to responsible for at least a third of all childhood deaths worldwide – that's approximately 7,000 a day. Guatemala has the highest rate of malnutrition in the western hemisphere. In rural Mayan villages like this one it can be 80 percent or higher. <p></p><p> <b><a href="http://abc.go.com/watch/2020-/SH559026/VD55102823/2020-1217-world-health" target="external">Click here to watch the special.</a> <P> For information on how you can make a difference, go to <a href="http://saveone.net/" target="external">SaveOne.net</a>. </b> <p>
    Donna Svennevik/ABC News
  • Guatemala Slideshow

    In Guatemala, we discover another face of hunger -- not starvation, but stunted growth. ABC News Anchor Christiane Amanpour measures a woman, in Antigua, Guatemala. Victoria, 62, is just 53 inches tall, less than the average height of a normal 10-year-old.
    Donna Svennevik/ABC News
  • Global Health

    Nine-year-old children in Guatemala are significantly shorter than the World Health Organization's global average height for their age. Chronic malnourishment, which causes stunted growth, is an epidemic in Guatemala. In rural villages, more than 80 percent of the population is stunted.
    ABCNews
  • Another Face of Hunger: Malnutrition and Stunting in Guatemala

    These 9-year-olds from Lake Worth, Fla. are all of Guatemala-Mayan decent but born and raised in the U.S. with access to better food. They're all normal height or taller.
    ABC News
  • Guatemala Slideshow

    Christiane Amanpour interviews Luke Armstrong, who runs Casa Jackson, a recuperation center for severely malnourished infants in Antigua, Guatemala. Luke, originally from Bismark, N.D., says chronic malnutrition is especially dangerous in the first thousand days of life --between conception and age two -- the critical period when brains and bones need protein, minerals and vitamins to grow.
    Donna Svennevik/ABC News
  • Guatemala Slideshow

    Carlos may look healthy, but he is one year old and can't yet stand on his own or babble. Chronic malnourishment not only stunts growth, it also causes stunted mental development, a lower IQ and a weaker immune system, putting children like this one at greater risk of dying from common diseases.
    Donna Svennevik/ABC News
  • Guatemala Slideshow

    Rafael Femenias, a volunteer from Spain, helps soothe a sick infant, two-year-old Gricelda, at Casa Jackson. Her mother didn't take vitamins or other prenatal precautions during pregnancy. The center not only provides malnourished babies with milk, food and vitamins but, thanks to volunteers, individualized attention and bonding that many of these children lack.
    Donna Svennevik/ABC News
  • Guatemala Slideshow

    Former Casa Jackson patients return for a nutritional seminar and a medical checkup. Experts say one of the keys to ending malnutrition is education.
    Donna Svennevik/ABC News
  • Guatemala Slideshow

    5-year-old Fabiola, from Cajagualten, Guatemala, stands in front of her family's ration of corn. Corn, used to make tortillas, is the primary dietary staple in Guatemala.
    Donna Svennevik/ABC News
  • Guatemala Slideshow

    In rural communities like Cajagualten, doctors say most children are probably older than they look and at least six or eight inches shorter than they should be. Such children do not achieve normal social and motor milestones, don't perform well in school, and in later life have lower earning potential. Statistically speaking, just two of the five children pictured here at a school playground will make it beyond the 6th grade.
    Donna Svennevik/ABC News
  • Guatemala Slideshow

    ABC's Christiane Amanpour speaks with a group of local children in Cajagualten about what they eat. The typical diet in the village consisted of tortillas, coffee and beans. It lacked variety, meat and milk. Dr. Peter Rolhoff, who runs clinics in several villages, says, "Dealing with the problem of early childhood stunting, childhood malnutrition is really the solution to breaking the cycle of poverty."
    Donna Svennevik/ABC News
  • Guatemala Slideshow

    A Mayan family from a nearby village packs up flour, rice and other food they received as a donation.<p></p><p><p> <b>This story is part of ABC News' "Be the Change: Save a Life" initiative, a year-long series of broadcast and digital coverage focusing on global health issues. <a href="http://abc.go.com/watch/2020-/SH559026/VD55102823/2020-1217-world-health" target="external">Click here to watch the special.</a> <P> For complete coverage and information on how you can personally make a difference, go to <a href="http://saveone.net/" target="external">SaveOne.net</a>. </b> <p>
    Donna Svennevik/ABC News
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