Tom Berman/ABC News
  • Global Health

    Community Health Africa Trust, a not-for-profit group, travels northern Kenya by camel. The camels carry medical supplies and equipment that the group uses to set up makeshift clinics to treat the Samburu people. <a href="http://abcnews.go.com/2020/video/kenya-camel-trek-saves-human-lives-13708103">Click here to watch the full story on "20/20"</a> and for information on how you can make a difference, visit <a href="http://www.saveone.net/" target="external">SaveOne.net.</a>
    Tom Berman/ABC News
  • Global Health

    A warrior from Kenya's Samburu tribe leads a camel carrying a solar-powered refrigeration unit. Someday, units like the one pictured could be used to carry vaccines that would allow Samburu children to be immunized for the first time in their villages.
    Tom Berman/ABC News
  • Global Health

    A nurse with Community Health Africa Trust attends to a boy with a sprained elbow. The group's clinics handle illnesses and injuries ranging from pneumonia to burns and also provides HIV/AIDS testing and contraception.
    Tom Berman/ABC News
  • Global Health

    Samburu women and children attend a family planning clinic run by the Community Health Africa Trust. The woman wearing blue, who has eight children, received a birth control injection.<p>This story is part of ABC News' "Be the Change: Save a Life" initiative, a year-long series of broadcast and digital coverage focusing on global health issues. Watch the kickoff on a special-edition of "20/20" Friday at 10 p.m. ET.</p>
    Tom Berman/ABC News
  • Global Health

    A young girl in Dhaka, Bangladesh holds a bottle of brown water. In Bangladesh, 55,000 children die each year from drinking contaminated water, according to WaterAid.<p></p><p> <b>This story is part of ABC News' "Be the Change: Save a Life" initiative, a year-long series of broadcast and digital coverage focusing on global health issues. <a href="http://abc.go.com/watch/2020-/SH559026/VD55102823/2020-1217-world-health" target="external">Click here to watch the special.</a> <P> For complete coverage and information on how you can personally make a difference, go to <a href="http://saveone.net/" target="external">SaveOne.net</a>. </b> <p>
    Gitika Ahuja/ABC News
  • Global Health

    The largest slum in Dhaka, Bangladesh is surrounded by Gulshan Lake. Dinghies carrying commuters must dodge floating garbage to move through the heavily-polluted lake. Hundreds of thousands of Dhaka slum dwellers have no access to clean water.
    Courtesy Shumon Ahmed
  • Global Health

    Many in Dhaka don't have running tap water. Because water access is intermittent, residents must store water when they can get access to it. This man takes a shower with water stored in a bucket.
    Gitika Ahuja/ABC News
  • Global Health

    As in Bangladesh, access to clean water is also a major challenge for many in the Central African Republic.
    ABC News
  • Global Health

    The not-for-profit group Charity: Water has launched a project to bring clean water to the indigenous Bayaka tribe in the Central African Republic. The group is helping build wells on Bayaka land. Charity: Water teamed up with another group, Integrated Community Development International, to drill the well pictured here in November.
    ABC News
  • Global Health

    The wells don't always offer a permanent solution -- if they're not maintained they may fall into disrepair. Here, a boy walks past a broken well.
    ABC News
  • Global Health

    Nine-year-old children in Guatemala are significantly shorter than the World Health Organization's global average height for their age. Chronic malnourishment, which causes stunted growth, is an epidemic in Guatemala. In rural villages, more than 80 percent of the population is stunted.
    ABCNews
  • Global Health

    In addition to stunted growth, malnourishment is blamed for cognitive problems and weakened immune systems, making children more likely to die young. Here, villagers in Cajagualten, Guatemala line up at a clinic that distributes clothes and provides medical check-ups. Doctors here are looking for signs of severe malnourishment.
    ABC News
  • Global Health

    ABC News producer Gwen Gowen poses with a 33-year-old woman and her 7-year-old son in Antigua, Guatemala. Despite his age, the boy is already close in height to his short-statured mother, thanks to the nutritional intervention he received at a young age.
    ABC News
  • Global Health

    The Kingdom of Lesotho is a sovereign nation surrounded by South Africa. It's roughly the size of Maryland, but this small country has a big problem--it has one of the highest rates of HIV in the world.
    Marc Dorian/ABC News
  • ABC News Investigates Global Health Issues

    During the winter months, much of the region is impassable by car or motorbike. Riders on a special breed of Basotho pony make weekly rounds to isolated health centers to deliver drugs, pick up blood samples and return HIV tests.
    Marc Dorian/ABC News
  • Global Health

    The Lesotho government, along with The Elizabeth Glaser Pediatric AIDS Foundation, is trying to make sure the next generation of Lesotho children are HIV-free.
    Marc Dorian/ABC News
  • Health Crises Around the World

    Tuberculosis is a curable disease but it continues to spread in the developing world, including Cambodia, which has a high rate of TB infection as well as TB-HIV infection -- cases in which people with HIV also contract tuberculosis. Dr. Anne Goldfeld, a professor at Harvard Medical School and the co-founder of the Cambodian and Global Health Committee, has spent her career studying such diseases and caring for patients. Above, Goldfeld shows ABC News correspondent Dan Harris an x-ray from a TB patient at Khmer Soviet Friendship Hospital in Phnom Penh, Cambodia.
    ABC News
  • Health Crises Around the World

    Goldfeld and Harris visit a TB patient at Khmer Soviet Friendship Hospital.
    ABC News
  • Health Crises Around the World

    A three-year-old girl waits to be tested for tuberculosis in Svay Rieng, Cambodia. She was later found not to have the disease. <p> <b>This story is part of ABC News' "Be the Change: Save a Life" initiative, a year-long series of broadcast and digital coverage focusing on global health issues. <a href="http://abc.go.com/watch/2020-/SH559026/VD55102823/2020-1217-world-health" target="external">Click here to watch the special.</a> <P> For complete coverage and information on how you can personally make a difference, go to <a href="http://saveone.net/" target="external">SaveOne.net</a>. </b> <p>
    ABC News
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