Shumon Ahmed/ABC News
  • Global Health: Bangladesh

    The largest slum in Dhaka, Bangladesh, is surrounded by Gulshan Lake. Dinghies carrying commuters must dodge floating garbage to move through the heavily-polluted lake. Millions of Dhaka slum dwellers have no access to clean water. A test of a water sample in Dhaka slums by ABC News found it was contaminated with E. coli bacteria.<p></p><p> <p> <b>This story is part of ABC News' "Be the Change: Save a Life" initiative. <a href="http://abc.go.com/watch/2020-/SH559026/VD55102823/2020-1217-world-health" target="external">Click here to watch the special.</a> <P> For complete coverage and information on how you can personally make a difference, go to <a href="http://saveone.net/" target="external">SaveOne.net</a>. </b> <p>
    Shumon Ahmed/ABC News
  • Global Health: Bangladesh

    A Dhaka man showers outdoors because so many don't have running tap water. Because water access is intermittent residents must store water when they can get access to it. This man takes a shower with water stored in a bucket.
    Gitika Ahuja/ABC News
  • Global Health: Bangladesh

    In Bangladesh, diarrheal diseases like cholera and typhoid are some of the top five causes of death in all age groups. Within any two-week period, at least 10 percent of children under 5 suffer at least one episode of diarrhea, according to the Bangladesh Demographic and Health survey of 2007. Of these, just one in five is taken to a health provider. Boys are at slightly higher risk for diarrhea, as are all children under 5 because of their immature immune systems.
    Gitika Ahuja/ABC News
  • Global Health: Bangladesh

    A young girl goes to the bathroom on the rooftop of her home. According to the World Bank, 30 percent of the population has no access to sanitation and less than half of all homes have safe disposal of feces for children under 5, according to the MICS 2006 report. According to UNICEF, solid waste is responsible for 49 vector borne diseases, such as dengue fever and malaria in Bangladesh.
    Gitika Ahuja/ABC News
  • Global Health: Bangladesh

    There are often no suitable latrines in schools for girls like this one. The effect goes beyond sanitation: In order to use the bathroom, girls must go home during the school day. When they menstruate, many choose not to go to school at all, missing weeks of school throughout the year.
    Gitika Ahuja/ABC News
  • Global Health: Bangladesh

    This locked water pump signifies what a prized and fought-over commodity water is in Dhaka. Some pumps like these are locked up because they are privately owned, others because there is no water to be had.
    Gitika Ahuja/ABC News
  • Global Health: Bangladesh

    ABC News Chief Health and Medical Editor Dr. Richard Besser talks with a group of water sellers in Dhaka, Bangladesh. They fill up jugs of water from this municipal pump and sell it for pennies, often carrying the pails up 10 flights of stairs to clients. The smell of sulphur filled the air near the pump.
    Gitika Ahuja/ABC News
  • Global Health: Bangladesh

    At a cost of approximately $90, a water filtration system like this is something few families in Bangladesh can afford. Studies also show that people are unlikely to use these kinds of devices because it takes too much time to filter the water. Behavior change is one of the biggest challenges to improved hygiene and sanitation.
    Gitika Ahuja/ABC News
  • Global Health: Bangladesh

    The people in this Dhaka village have limited access to water, with water flowing from this shared water point just once every other hour. Families must schedule their bathing, washing of clothes and dishes accordingly. Here a young girl gives a boy a bath -- others from the community bathe and gather water nearby.
    Gitika Ahuja/ABC News
  • Global Health: Bangladesh

    ABC News' Chief Health and Medical Editor Dr. Richard Besser walks down "Shankhari Bazaar" in overcrowded Dhaka, Bangladesh. By 2030, half the population of Bangladesh, nearly 90 million people are expected to live in urban areas, most of them below the poverty line. Bangladesh is the most densely populated large country in the world.
    Shumon Ahmed/ABC News
  • Global Health: Bangladesh

    This happy baby girl plays with a stick near a communal cooking area. In order to reduce costs, many families in this village share a cooking area, latrine and water point -- each within 5 feet of the other. The likelihood of diarrhea is slightly higher for children who use these kinds of shared toilet facilities.
    Gitika Ahuja/ABC News
  • Global Health: Bangladesh

    This man cooks fish at his entryway so that smoke and fumes from his limited fuel supply don't overpower his one-room home. Fish is at the core of Bangladeshi cuisine, usually eaten alongside a plate of lentils and rice. There are more than 40 varieties of fish that are used in Bangladeshi food.
    Gitika Ahuja/ABC News
  • Global Health: Bangladesh

    This tangle of power lines above a Dhaka street depict the fragile balance of power that is part of daily life here. Power outages are a daily occurrence in most parts of the city. Playful monkeys are often seen prancing -- even gnawing -- on the wires above.
    Gitika Ahuja/ABC News
  • Global Health: Bangladesh

    Bangladesh is among the 10 countries with the highest number of childhood deaths blamed on preventable diarrheal diseases, according to the World Health Organization. Research shows that washing hands with soap is a cost effective way to reduce diarrheal diseases by more than 40 percent. Despite its known success, UNICEF reports that few people in Bangladesh wash their hands correctly, often not using soap or only washing one hand.
    Gitika Ahuja/ABC News
  • Global Health: Bangladesh

    Bangladeshi culture is rich with time honored traditions. This young boy wears a black "kohl" mark painted onto one side of his forehead, believed to ward off evil and keep him safe from illness.
    Gitika Ahuja/ABC News
  • Global Health: Bangladesh

    Seventy-five percent of Bangladesh is rural. Agriculture is the largest contributor to the country's economy, with 62 percent of the workforce employed in this sector. Bangladesh's main crops are rice, jute, sugar cane, potatoes, wheat, tea and tobacco.
    Gitika Ahuja/ABC News
  • Global Health: Bangladesh

    The millions of residents of Dhaka slums live alongside sewage because there is no drainage or waste disposal system. Here a jerry-rigged water pipe, held together with duct tape, travels through raw sewage. These unsanitary conditions are only made worse during monsoon season when streets and alleys flood in a matter of seconds.
    Gitika Ahuja/ABC News
  • Global Health: Bangladesh

    A young girl in Dhaka, Bangladesh holds a bottle of brown water. In Bangladesh, 55,000 children die each year from drinking contaminated water, according to WaterAid, an international group which works to improve access to clean water around the world. <p></p><p> <b>This story is part of ABC News' "Be the Change: Save a Life" initiative, a year-long series of broadcast and digital coverage focusing on global health issues. <a href="http://abc.go.com/watch/2020-/SH559026/VD55102823/2020-1217-world-health" target="external">Click here to watch the special.</a> <P> For complete coverage and information on how you can personally make a difference, go to <a href="http://saveone.net/" target="external">SaveOne.net</a>. </b> <p>
    Gitika Ahuja/ABC News
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