Adding Omega-3 to Your Diet

These days, it's hard to find a dietary buzzword that carries more impact than omega-3, and with good reason.

The American Heart Association (AHA) says omega-3 fatty acids can provide a host of benefits to those with cardiovascular disease, as well as healthy people.

In order to get the highest levels of omega-3 fatty acids, the AHA suggests eating any of these fatty fish at least twice a week:

Mackerel (0.34 grams omega-3 fatty acids per serving)

Herring (1.71-1.81 grams omega-3 fatty acids per serving)

Tuna (0.26-0.73 grams omega-3 fatty acids per serving)

Salmon (0.68-1.83 grams omega-3 fatty acids per serving)

Halibut (0.40-1.00 grams omega-3 fatty acids per serving)

The AHA says that certain other foods contain alpha-linolenic acid (LNA), which can become omega-3 fatty acid in the body:

Tofu and other forms of soybeans

Canola and its oil

Walnuts

Flaxseed and its oil

For a comprehensive listing of Medicine on the Cutting Edge reports with John McKenzie, click here.

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