Blended Families: Recipe for Sibling Rivalry?

Adopting two infant boys within three years of one another, Blomquist told ABCNEWS.com that her children never had any animosity toward one another because of the adoption, and their problems were rooted in who they were as individuals and how they related to one another.

"I think the general public sees adopted children as causing more problems within families than biological ones do, and sometimes that is the case but often it's not," said Blomquist, who wrote the book "Insight Into Adoption," which stems from her experience as an adoptive mother.

"Each time we adopted a baby boy, it was our daughter's little baby brother," Blomquist said. "When you're growing up, children are children."

The problems many adopted kids have to deal with are certainly important to recognize, said Adam Pertman, executive director of the Adoption Institute and author of "Adoption Nation," who went on to say that they may not be any worse than other problems families face.

"There are a lot of blended families that bring together different sorts of kids and do just fine," Pertman said. "They bring their own challenges and sometimes there are issues and sometimes not, but there's nothing particularly special about adoption in this respect. It just has its own particular dynamic."

"Are there complexities and differences? Of course there are," Pertman said. "The complexities are inherent — one sibling looks like you and another does not."

"But it's not good or bad," he added. "It's just true."

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