HPV Vaccine for Boys Recommended

Dr. Richard Besser discusses new CDC recommendations.
3:00 | 10/25/11

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Transcript for HPV Vaccine for Boys Recommended
Human capital -- virus -- HPV is the most common sexually transmitted disease in the US than when a vaccine became available. The Centers for Disease Control recommended the shop for all girls as a preventative measure but today the advisory committee on immunization practices at the CDC. Voted on whether boys should get the vaccine as well and here with the result. From that -- is ABC news chief health and medical editor doctor rich -- ambassador thanks so much for being here with break. It's it is great news they just voted. And any committee voted thirteen to nothing with one abstention that all boys aged eleven to twelve should get the HPV vaccine -- -- just like girls and you're not surprised. I'm not you know when He first recommended this vaccine -- and 2009 there wasn't all that much information about disease in in men. But now we know a lot more and so there's evidence that. Getting this vaccine could protect men as well as women from what kinds of cancer as well so there's a number of things this this this virus causes -- causes genital wards and both men and women. He causes cervical cancer and that's been the big push it curves for women. But now we know that -- also -- -- -- other forms of cancer including oral cancer throat cancers. And that's the one more than 8000 cases of oral cancer in men and women each year. Likely due to HPV and that is such a triple cancer treatment -- -- -- and if you can prevent them. View of some of those cancers it can be a real public health. Plus and talk about the U believes so strongly inspecting had -- -- back -- back. I I did you know back in 2009 when they recommended for girls they said it was approved for boys but not recommended as the routine vaccine you can do -- -- if you wanted. But He as I've learned more about HPV I was doing a story on this earlier this year I met a man. Who had -- stage four. Cancer in his throat from HPV. And He taught me him and his decision to not just -- -- his girls but his son. I thought about it from my kids and I did more reading and learn more about. Other diseases caused by HPV and decided or protect my kids I recommended to the to teenagers IC in my clinic to. And so why not give it to my own children. So let's go through the current recommendations now both for girls and for boys so -- the recommendation now is that. Children get this before they're sexually active and the reason for that is. Once you've been infected with of the virus vaccine no longer works. And so they're using them the preteen visit that 1112 year old is -- when you're getting a meningitis shot -- some other boosters. To give this vaccine so all boys and girls age eleven and twelve to get three doses of this vaccine. The first 21 month apart and then the third -- six months after the first. And how long and are they protected well I mean that's a great question -- -- they have to continue to follow. People into adulthood and see -- need boosters later right now it's looking great after six years. Which is got an outside of facts have come up well you know all vaccines have some side effects so -- this vaccine -- in the arm some fever. And then when slightly surprising side effect in that's fainting. You see -- making more commonly in teenagers who get any shots or vaccines. And so as a doctor or is apparently want to be be aware this so that. You're your teen should be sitting down or lying down and should stay that way for about ten to fifteen minutes right so that they don't get that reaction to a needle shot thanks. Right that is very scary now -- open about their happened some objections to. This vaccine it largely it -- from outside the medical community is that right. Well yeah I mean the uptake for this vaccine is probably one of the worst we've had -- in the new vaccine only 49%. Of teenage girls have had at least one dose. If you look at the full series -- 33 vaccines it's lower than 30% is there any partial protection that comes from just the one there is some but I -- rely on you know if you if you committed to going down this route to get all three but I think. The reason is that the vaccine implies that your children -- one -- have sex. And for a lot of parents they don't want there annoying look at they don't think about they don't want -- ever have a sex talk. And so and thinking about giving this vaccine for disease that's transmitted sexually. It is in some way condone -- sex and it's not it's it's. It's protecting your children as they as they grow into adults and it's so -- and made the point earlier we are speaking before this interview that the hepatitis B is now routine vaccination hepatitis B is another vaccine that's primarily given to prevent liver cancer and hepatitis B infection can cause liver cancer. And we given it birth and we give it two months we even at six months. So parents at that time aren't thinking well how -- happens be transmitted. Well it's through blood it's rejections and through -- something that isn't an issue for babies it's an issue when they get older brides -- do you think eventually this vaccination well. I enjoy the same universalist I think so as we start to see reductions in cancer rates from I think more and more parents -- want to get -- on that and and possibly you know there's some there's some new -- suggesting HPV may be linked to heart disease and some women. Or even more fuel to getting if that pans out yet another reason to to get -- facts operate faster thank you so much to pleasure.

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

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