Amy Winehouse: Career Shadowed by Manic Depression

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"There are many children of bad marriages that don't go into addiction," Sack said. "But it does raise the risk of the child to get involved in drugs and alcohol."

Winehouse had reconciled with her father since then, but that did not seem to help her to stay sober.

Mitch Winehouse, an aspiring singer himself, said he knew his daughter's career and the publicity surrounding her personal life helped his chances at a music career.

"It [the relationship between father and daughter] was complicated," said Ian Drew, senior music editor of US Weekly magazine. "She loved her father, but he also fed off of her."

"He couldn't rein her in as much as he loved her," Drew said.

Although family members are primary motivators for addicts to seek treatment, the ultimate decision to follow through lies with an addict, Sack said.

While Winehouse was not seeking formal treatment, she was looking to continue her career. Winehouse was reportedly working on another album.

"It is clear that she was hopeful she'd be well enough to make another album," said Sack. "She was looking to do better."

"She wanted more than she was getting in her life," said Sack.

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