Amanda Knox Appeals Court Has Reached a Verdict

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Amanda Knox Tells Italian Court She Is Innocent

The six jurors and two judges do not have to be unanimous in their verdict. A majority vote will decide their fate, and if they are evenly split, Knox and Sollecito will walk.

The final week of the nearly year-long appeal was a barrage of verbal fireworks.

Lawyers for the prosecution called Knox a sex obsessed "she devil" and a liar. Twice they showed the court grisly photos of Kercher's nude and bloodied body, along with close-ups of the gash in her neck.

"They [the defendants] are young, and they killed for nothing, for no reason," said prosecutor Manuela Comodi.

An attorney for Kercher's family told the jury, "On Monday, Meredith's mother, sister and brother will be here to hear your sentence. ... They will look you in the eyes for the first time. With one look, they will ask you to confirm the sentence."

Knox's defenders countered saying that she wasn't a "she devil" but was more like Jessica Rabbit, the voluptuous cartoon character who was tender and loving. "I'm not bad, I'm just drawn that way," was her trademark line.

ABC News has the full story in its new video eBook, THE AMANDA KNOX STORY: A Murder in Perugia, available for sale on the iBooks, Kindle, and Nook eBook stores.

Knox's lawyers told the court she had been "crucified" by the media during the investigation and trial, a reference to the often lurid coverage of the case in tabloid papers, as well as seven books and a movie.

Luciano Ghirga, part of Knox's defense team, told the jury to look at her and told them, "Her heart is full of hope to be set free."

Forensics may have played a bigger role than rhetoric in the court's verdict. Much of the appeal has revolved around whether the DNA on two key pieces of evidence were credible.

Two court appointed experts looked at the prosecution's evidence and delivered a damning assessment that the manner in which the DNA was collected, stored and analyzed was below international standards.

One involved the alleged murder weapon, a knife found in Sollecito's kitchen. Prosecutors claimed the handle contained Knox's DNA and a speck on the blade contained Kercher's DNA. But the experts said the speck was too small to make a second test to confirm the analysis and the experts concluded that DNA came from bread.

The second piece of evidence was allegedly Sollecito's DNA on the bra clasp cut from Kercher's bra during the attack. The experts said it was improperly handled and likely had been contaminated.

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