Car Bomb in Turkish Capital Ankara Leaves at Least 37 Dead

PHOTO: Medics carry an injured person at the explosion site in the busy center of Turkish capital, Ankara, Turkey, Sunday, March 13, 2016.PlayAP Photo
WATCH 2 Separate Terror Attacks Reported in Less Than 24 Hours

A car bomb explosion in the Turkish capital of Ankara has left at least 37 people dead and over 100 injured, according to Turkey's health minister.

Today’s attack targeted civilians at a bus stop, Interior Minister Efkan Ala said.

Health Minister Mehmet Muezzinoglu said 30 victims died at the scene, while the other four died at hospitals.

Muezzinoglu also said 125 people were wounded, with 19 of them in serious condition.

The United States condemned the attack, "which has taken innocent lives and injured scores,” National Security Council spokesman Ned Price said.

"Our thoughts and prayers go out to those killed and injured as well as to their loved ones," Price's statement said. "This horrific act is only the most recent of many terrorist attacks perpetrated against the Turkish people. The United States stands together with Turkey, a NATO Ally and valued partner, as we confront the scourge of terrorism."

The explosion occurred on the city's main boulevard, Ataturk Bulvari, which is near the city's main square, Kizilay, The Associated Press reported.

PHOTO: Members of emergency services work at the scene of an explosion in Ankara, Turkey, March 13, 2016. AP Photo
Members of emergency services work at the scene of an explosion in Ankara, Turkey, March 13, 2016.

Two days ago, the U.S. Embassy said there was a "potential terrorist plot to attack Turkish government buildings and housing located in the Bahcelievler area of Ankara." The U.S. Embassy said Americans should avoid the area.

It was not immediately clear whether the U.S. Embassy's warning was related to the attack.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.