'I Have Very Little Time,' Moscow Terror Victim Predicted

PHOTO Anna Mishutina Anna Yablonskaya MOSCOW AIRPORT BOMBING
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A celebrated playwright who was one of the victims of the suicide bombing Monday in a Moscow airport had written just one month ago that she felt she had "very little time."

Anna Mishutina, who wrote under the pseudonym Anna Yablonskaya, arrived at Moscow's Domodedovo Airport just after 4 p.m. Monday from her native Ukraine for an awards ceremony.

As she entered the arrivals hall in the Russian capital's busiest airport, a suicide bomber detonated an explosive device, killing Mishutina and at least 34 others in the deadliest terrorist attack in Russia in almost a year.

Mishutina, who lived in Odessa with her husband and 3-year-old daughter, was recently described by Moscow's leading English language newspaper as "one of the most talked-about new Russian playwrights."

But just one month ago she posted an ominous note on her blog.

"It seems to me that I have very little time," she wrote.

"I really didn't like it when I read that," Mishutina's friend Natalia Antonova told ABC News. "I don't know if people can feel these things coming, but she was a very sensitive person, very attuned to the physical and the metaphysical."

Mishutina's plays were produced in Russia, Ukraine and Belarus. According to the Royal Court Theatre in London, she took part in an international residency last year, and there will be a reading of her play "The Pagans" there in April.

"She was a very modern playwright," Antonova said. "Someone who did a great job of exploring modern family life in particular, and somehow managed to be both very warm and very unsentimental."

Anna Mishutina, celebrated playwright who wrote under the pseudonym Anna Yablonskaya.

Memories are still fresh of the March 29 double suicide attack that killed 40 people on Moscow's subway. It was an attack that hardly affected daily life in the bustling capital but was a deadly reminder of the conflict that plays out daily along the country's southern fringe between Russian security forces and Islamist militants.

In the March attack, two female suicide bombers blew themselves up at two different subway stops during the morning rush hour, one just steps away from the headquarters of the former KGB.

The Chechen militant who claimed responsibility for the attack warned in a video two days afterwards that they would continue.

"I promise you that war will come on your streets," Doku Umarov said. "And you will feel it with your own lives and skin."

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