Jeffery Kofman/ABC News
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    The David Sheldrick Wildlife Trust in Nairobi, Kenya, is a charity started in 1977 to protect the lives of orphaned elephants and rhinos in the wild. It is the world's first elephant orphanage, and 17 orphaned baby elephants call it home. Keepers become surrogate parents. <a href="http://www.sheldrickwildlifetrust.org/"target="external">CLICK HERE to learn more at the David Sheldrick Wildlife Trust website.</a>
    Jeffery Kofman/ABC News
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    The Trust has seen a huge increase in orphaned elephants in recent years, partly because of drought and partly because communication in remote areas has improved. The biggest threat is poaching. In this photo, keepers walk with the baby elephants at sunrise.
    Jeffery Kofman/ABC News
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    Kenyan native Dame Daphne Sheldrick is the widow of one of the founders of Kenya's National Parks. Although she has no scientific training, she has spent the past 50 years living in the brush with her husband, working with elephants and has pioneered techniques for keeping baby elephants alive.
    The David Sheldrick Wildlife Trust
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    "Elephants are very human emotionally, and they are very bonded to family," Sheldrick told ABC News' Jeffery Kofman. "Having lost their elephant mother, their elephant family, they are very fragile. They just want to die. They don't even want to live. You've got to turn that around in a few days, otherwise you've lost the calf." This undated photo shows a younger Sheldrick playing with a baby elephant.
    The David Sheldrick Wildlife Trust
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    According to the David Sheldrick Wildlife Trust's website, it is estimated that there were more than 3 million elephants in Africa a century ago. Today, there are fewer than 300,000, with thousands being slaughtered for their tusks. This undated photo shows a younger Sheldrick feeding a baby elephant named Angela.
    The David Sheldrick Wildlife Trust
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    The baby elephants at The David Sheldrick Wildlife Trust are fed every three hours, day and night. Each will drink 25 quarts of milk a day. The bottles are filled with powdered milk, shipped in bulk from England after Dame Daphne Sheldrick discovered the calves couldn't tolerate cow's milk.
    Jeffery Kofman/ABC News
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    "An elephant can't live without milk under the age of 3," Sheldrick said. "Not one of the 130 that we've raised would be alive today without the care that we've given them."
    Jeffery Kofman/ABC News
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    The Trust is one of the most popular tourist attractions in Nairobi and tourists pay a small fee to watch the midday feeding. Supplemented by a foster care plan run through the group's website, these viewings help cover the $1,000 per month it costs to maintain each baby elephant. <a href="http://www.sheldrickwildlifetrust.org/"target="external">CLICK HERE to learn more at the David Sheldrick Wildlife Trust website.</a>
    Jeffery Kofman/ABC News
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    Local schoolchildren get in for free, and for many it is the first time they will actually see a live elephant. The calves love rolling in the dirt, much to the crowds' delight.
    Jeffery Kofman/ABC News
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    Dame Daphne Sheldrick was knighted by Queen Elizabeth of England in 2006 for her work in protecting elephants.
    The David Sheldrick Wildlife Trust
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    Sheldrick said 69 of the Trust's orphaned elephants are now back in the wild and thriving. "They are bringing the babies back to show the human keepers," she said, adding that she truly loves these animals. "There has to be emotion involved because they can read your heart, and if you don't care they will know that."
    The David Sheldrick Wildlife Trust
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