Courtesy of Christian Pondella
  • Ice Climbing

    Canadian ice climbing champion Will Gadd is one of the best climbers in the world. Spending his days scaling frosty terrains in some of the coldest places on Earth, the 42-year-old Gadd has won several climbing medals.
    Courtesy of Christian Pondella
  • Ice Climbing

    Armed with pulleys, pick axes, helmets, razor sharp crampons and a camera or two, Gadd has traveled to Nepal, Norway, British Columbia and many other places to climb up hundreds of feet of ice.
    Courtesy of Christian Pondella
  • Ice Climbing

    Gadd told "Nightline" anchor Bill Weir that he makes a living through sponsorships so he needs photographic proof of his exploits. He is shown here scaling a 650-foot frozen waterfall in Eidfjord, Norway in Feb. 2011.
    Courtesy of Christian Pondella
  • Ice Climbing

    Adventure sports photographer and California native Christian Pondella (left) is usually the one to capture these unbelievable images. "For some reason I chose to photograph guys in cold, snowy places," Pondella said. "If I did it all over again, I think I'd shoot supermodels in the tropics." The two are shown here on a frozen waterfall in Eidfjord, Norway. <a href="http://www.christianpondella.com/"target="external">CLICK HERE to see more of Christian Pondella's photography on his website.</a>
    Courtesy of Christian Pondella
  • Ice Climbing

    High in the Canadian Rockies, Gadd taught Bill Weir the techniques of ice climbing in an ominously-named place called the Weeping Wall. It's been described as a "vertical football field" of ice.
    Courtesy of Christian Pondella
  • Ice Climbing

    Ice climbing has a grading system, and Gadd said the Weeping Wall was about a grade 2 to a grade 6. The higher the grade number, the steeper and longer the climb. Bill Weir is shown here on the right about to jam an ice pick into the mountain face, with Gadd next to him.
    Courtesy of Christian Pondella
  • Ice Climbing

    When asked what was the hairiest situation he had ever been in, Gadd laughed and said, "driving in New York City." Gadd is shown here scaling a floating iceberg off the Labrador coast in Canada, July 2005.
    Courtesy of Christian Pondella
  • Ice Climbing

    Although obviously aware of the dangers, Gadd said the only real injury he's ever had while climbing was when a piece of ice fell and broke his nose. Gadd is shown here climbing under a frozen wall of water in Eidfjord, Norway.
    Courtesy of Christian Pondella
  • Ice Climbing

    In a somber moment, Gadd described the time he almost lost his friend and photographer, Christian Pondella, while the two were climbing in Sweden in a mine shaft 500 feet below the surface. "I made kind of a judgment error," Gadd said. "Big, huge block of ice, we're talking the size of a bus, broke loose, starts rattling down this mine."
    Courtesy of Christian Pondella
  • Ice Climbing

    "I'm watching from across the way what's going on," Gadd continued. "To me, if I kill myself ice climbing that's one thing, [but] one of my friends, that would actually be worse for me. And that was probably just the worst moment and the silence after it all stopped and we're waiting like, 'Are you OK? And I heard, 'I'm OK, I'm OK, you're OK?' It was like, YAY!"
    Courtesy of Christian Pondella
  • Ice Climbing

    Gadd acknowledged that there is a dark side to ice climbing. "People do die, he said. "[But] there's great magic and great joy in it. So for me it's a continual quest to just try and be sharp and be on it and work hard to make sure it's a safe outing." Gadd is shown here climbing in Helmcken, British Columbia, Canada in January 2011.
    Courtesy of Christian Pondella
  • Ice Climbing

    Climbing in Helmcken, British Columbia, Canada in January 2011. "You'll find when you get on the ice your whole world -- you're not going to think about your mortgage payment," Gadd said. "It gets rid of all that junk. You know, other people meditate -- I go ice climb."
    Courtesy of Christian Pondella
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