Jeffrey Kofman/ABC News
  • Jeffrey Kofman in Libya

    It's a challenge working as journalists in Tripoli today under the conditions the Gadhafi government has laid down. The ABC News team can't take our cameras outside the hotel without a government representative in tow. And he decides where we can and cannot go. That's Salam, our minder, talking to ABC producer Bruno Roeber. Salam was perfectly friendly, but it was clear we crossed him at our peril.
    Jeffrey Kofman/ABC News
  • Jeffrey Kofman in Libya

    Wherever you go in the parts of Libya still under Gadhafi's control, you see Gadhafi. His heavily retouched face glares down from massive posters and billboards on almost every corner. It often looks he's some menacing wax figure straight from Madam Tussaud's.
    Jeffrey Kofman/ABC News
  • Jeffrey Kofman in Libya

    Foreigners are only allowed to travel in supervised outings, scornfully called 'Magical Mystery Tours.' We are told nothing about where we are going, how may stops we will make or why we are visiting certain places. On this trip we were taken to the main hospital in Zawiya, west of Tripoli. A throng of nurses appeared from the hospital doors, singing and chanting their love for Gadhafi as we were leaving. They were being orchestrated by an intense woman who acted as choir mistress. There was nothing subtle about this. It was a craven play to our cameras so we could tell you that Libyans really do love their leader. You decide.
    Jeffrey Kofman/ABC News
  • Jeffrey Kofman in Libya

    As we shot of the street, this group of chanting, cheering school kids suddenly came bounding through the traffic toward us. They were singing songs of loyalty to Gadhafi. That green scarf is Gadhafi Green. You see it all over Tripoli, it's as if people are saying in earnest 'I'm with you, really, I am!'
    Jeffrey Kofman/ABC News
  • Jeffrey Kofman in Libya

    There's a level of fervor among Gadhafi supporters that is, at times, unnerving. This young man leaned out the window to scream at us about his love for Gadhafi. He was shaking so hard that I wondered whether he'd explode. Is he for real, or just acting for our camera?
    Jeffrey Kofman/ABC News
  • Jeffrey Kofman in Libya

    In Tripoli's exotic old souk, I spoke with a man in English. He professed his loyalty to Gadhafi. He's distressed to see the country divided in two, with the rebels controlling the east and Gadhafi controlling the west. He says there must be just one Libya. You never hear people criticizing Gadhafi in front of our cameras. That would be asking for trouble. But with the camera off and the minder out of earshot others we talked to quietly whispered to us 'Gadhafi no good, Gadhafi must go!'
    Jeffrey Kofman/ABC News
  • Jeffrey Kofman in Libya

    Head scarves, or hijab, are a must for women in Libya. This is a deeply conservative country. Unlike Tunisia where conservative Muslim dress is optional, here it is expected. This is also a 'dry' country: no alcohol is to be sold or consumed. In hotels for visitors the only concession are green bottles of Beck's non-alcoholic beer.
    Jeffrey Kofman/ABC News
  • Jeffrey Kofman in Libya

    With revolution paralyzing so much of the country, many businesses are shuttered. Many people are out of work. We found these guys hanging out in the souk, sipping coffee, smoking cigarettes and watching the world go by. Like so many, they are hoping there is a resolution to the stalemate that has this country waiting to see what happens next.
    Jeffrey Kofman/ABC News
  • Jeffrey Kofman in Libya

    Down on the harbor edge we came across dozens of men who had found the perfect distraction from the politics and the fear of these uncertain times. Like men in so many places around the world, they take refuge with their fishing rods. They are catching sardines. But as one man said to me, 'it's not just about eating fish, it's about getting away from it all.'
    Jeffrey Kofman/ABC News
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