• Shocking NYC Crime Scenes Locations Then and Now

    "Black Hawk" gangster Salvatore (Sammy) Santoro was found dead in he vestibule of 475 1/2 Hicks Street in Brooklyn, Jan. 31, 1957. He was shot four times in the head and the murder weapon was left at the scene. All historical images are from the <a href="http://nydn.us/9dYzJA" target="external">NY Daily News Archive</a>
  • Shocking NYC Crime Scenes Locations Then and Now

    Frankie Yale, a gangster known as the "Al Capone of Brooklyn", lost control of his Lincoln coupe in Brooklyn, July 1, 1928 and smashed into the front stoop of 923 44th Street in Borough Park. The building still stands today, as does the tree Frankie smashed into. NY press photographer Marc A. Hermann went into the Daily news archive photos, and re-shot the locations, for an eerie reminder of the p
  • Shocking NYC Crime Scenes Locations Then and Now

    East River and Jackson Street, Queens March 16, 1959. Pablo Melendez was driving Arcadia Santos home from a dance, when Melendez lost control of the car and plunged into the East River. He managed to swim to safety, but Santos did not survive. Historical Images were used from the <a href="http://nydn.us/9dYzJA" target="external">Daily News Archive</a> and were pasted onto the present day locatio
  • Shocking NYC Crime Scenes Locations Then and Now

    Josephine Deidor holds James Linares who was shot by her jealous boyfriend on the stairs of 992 Southern Blvd. in the Bronx, Sept. 25, 1961. A doorway on the landing has been covered up since the original picture was taken. All historical images are from the <a href="http://nydn.us/9dYzJA" target="external">NY Daily News Archive</a>.
  • Shocking NYC Crime Scenes Locations Then and Now

    Sonia Cartegena is consoled by the Rev. Eugene Erny at Porter Ave and Harrison Pl, April 4, 1959 in Brooklyn. A car crash resulted in the death of Sonia's sister, Martha, 3, who rode her tricycle across from her home on Porter Avenue. The scene has not changed in 51 years, and the bricks of the building at right still show the scars of impact.
  • Shocking NYC Crime Scenes Locations Then and Now

    One hundred and thirty-four people were killed after United Airline flight 826 collided with a smaller TWA flight over Staten Island, Dec. 17, 1960. Wreckage of the plane fills the intersection of Sterling Place and Seventh Ave in Park Slope, Brooklyn. Many of the buildings were destroyed beyond repair, and others still stand. At the time, this was the worst aviation disaster in U.S. history.
  • Shocking NYC Crime Scenes Locations Then and Now

    The Fulton Fish Market is set ablaze on the west side of South Street, Feb. 26, 1961 in New York. This two alarm fire sent a fire lieutenant to the hospital to be treated for smoke inhalation. These buildings still stand in various states of occupancy minus a few floors here and there. All historical images are from the <a href="http://nydn.us/9dYzJA" target="external">NY Daily News Archive</a>
  • Shocking NYC Crime Scenes Locations Then and Now

    Edna Egbert became distraught and climbed onto her ledge after not hearing from her son since his early enlistment. Police officers Ed Murphy and George Mundy distracted her so she could be pushed into a safety net. <a href="http://www.marchermann.com/" target="external">Photographer Marc A. Hermann</a> went to the Daily News archive photos and reshot the locations for an eerie reminder of the pa
    Charles Payne/Daily News Pix ; Marc A. Hermann
  • Shocking NYC Crime Scenes Locations Then and Now

    An M-7 tank destroyer rolls up PArk Row in front of City hall en route to the Fifth Avenue Library where it was placed on display, July 22, 1943. <a href="http://www.marchermann.com/" target="external">NY press photographer Marc A. Hermann</a> went into the <a href="http://nydn.us/9dYzJA" target="external">Daily News Archive</a> archive, and reshot the locations to compare how they look today.
  • Shocking NYC Crime Scenes Locations Then and Now

    A massive fire at the Elkins Paper and Twine Co. at 137 Wooster Street claimed the lives of two firefighters and four members of the New York Fire Patrol, Feb. 16, 1958. The building was demolished shortly after. <a href="http://www.marchermann.com/" target="external">Photographer Marc A. Hermann</a> went into the Daily news archive photos, and reshot the locations, for an eerie reminder of the pa
  • Shocking NYC Crime Scenes Locations Then and Now

    Firefighters fought a blaze at 31 Grand St. off of Kent Ave in Williamsburg Brooklyn, Feb. 16, 1946. The building today is now only 2 stories high. <a href="http://www.marchermann.com/" target="external">Photographer Marc A. Hermann</a> went into the <a href="http://nydn.us/9dYzJA" target="external">Daily News Archive</a> archive, re-shot the locations, showing us an eery reminder of the past.
    Paul Bernius/Daily News Pix ; Marc A. Hermann
  • Shocking NYC Crime Scenes Locations Then and Now

    A leaking gas pipe was the cause of a massive explosion at this Downtown Brooklyn office building that shattered storefronts and injured 28 people at 66 Court St, Jan. 31, 1961 in Brooklyn. The sturdy 30-story building survived without any lasting scars from this explosion.
  • Shocking NYC Crime Scenes Locations Then and Now

    A recently released inmate of the Brooklyn House of Detention stole a car with two friends, and crashed it against a light pole at Classon Ave and Pacific St, July 28, 1957 in Brooklyn. <a href="http://www.marchermann.com/" target="external">NY press photographer Marc A. Hermann</a> revealed that the auto shop in the background is still in business although it relocated across the street.
  • Shocking NYC Crime Scenes Locations Then and Now

    The Church of the Sacred Hearts on Hicks and Summit Street in Brooklyn was practically destroyed by a 5 alarm fire Jan. 11, 1951, but was rebuilt and still stands today. <a href="http://www.marchermann.com/" target="external">New York press photographer Marc A. Hermann</a> went into the Daily news archive photos, and reshot the locations for a look at then and now. of the past.
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