Sarah Rosenberg/ABC News
  • Roof to Table

    Although considered unconventional by most farmers today, hydroponics is a basic concept, as ancient as the Hanging Gardens of Babylon.
    Sarah Rosenberg/ABC News
  • Roof to Table

    John Mooney has created his own oasis of gardening on the roof of a building in the West Village of Manhattan. He intends to open a restaurant, Bell, Book & Candle, on the ground floor that will be sustained by the produce grown on the roof.
    Sarah Rosenberg/ABC News
  • Roof to Table

    Using hydroponics, and not soil, eliminates plant diseases and pests that can reside in soil. The nutrient-infused waters produce vibrant, colorful produce like this red leaf lettuce.
    Sarah Rosenberg/ABC News
  • Roof to Table

    "I like to tell people that they are so perfect they look fake," Mooney said of his strawberries.
    Sarah Rosenberg/ABC News
  • Roof to Table

    Mooney uses a system of nutrient-rich water circulating through the towers of plants. The towers can sustain dozens of separate plants. By not using soil, it keeps the systems lightweight enough to safely be located on a rooftop, a definite plus considering the building on which Mooney's garden is located is 100 years old.
    Sarah Rosenberg/ABC News
  • Roof to Table

    Using the hydroponic technology, Mooney is able to decrease the time required to grow the plants. For example, lettuces like the one pictured here, can be harvested within four weeks.
    Sarah Rosenberg/ABC News
  • Roof to Table

    Mooney also grows Bibb lettuce atop his roof. His new restaurant, Bell, Book & Candle, will be the first in the U.S. to grow its own food on a rooftop using hydroponics. He intends to grow enough produce to serve an 80-seat restaurant nightly for 10 months of the year.
    Sarah Rosenberg/ABC News
  • Roof to Table

    The vegetable farm even has its own supply of garbanzo beans (chick peas) for Mooney to add to the dishes of his restaurant.
    Sarah Rosenberg/ABC News
  • Roof to Table

    Chef John Mooney – gardener, restaurant owner, and "treehugger" – shows a little love to the tower of romaine lettuce he will use in salads and other dishes in the restaurant he plans to open.
    Sarah Rosenberg/ABC News
  • Roof to Table

    A small summer squash grows amongst the bounty of chef John Mooney's rooftop garden. The garden sits on top of the building of his soon-to-open restaurant, Bell Book and Candle in Manhattan's West Village.
    Sarah Rosenberg/ABC News
  • Roof to Table

    ABC's John Donvan (right) explores Mooney's hydroponic rooftop garden in Manhattan, six stories above the ground.
    Sarah Rosenberg/ABC News
  • Roof to Table

    Towers of lettuce grow on the rooftop of the building chef John Mooney will open his restaurant. Mooney cultivates his plants using a technology called hydroponics, which uses nutrient-rich mineral water, without soil to grow vegetables.
    Sarah Rosenberg/ABC News
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