When Restraining Orders Cannot Stop a Killer

"He was lying in wait for her...more likely for me," Cockerham said. When she arrived later to pick Candice up, she said, "I noticed the door was ajar. When I went to the door and pushed it open, I saw everything in disarray ...and he lunged at me with a knife."

Cockerham recounted details of the attack to "Nightline."

"He kept stabbing me, and I remember pulling a piece of glass out of my head," she said. "I remember feeling him choking me. I could just feel the blood and I looked at him and asked Jesus to save me. That is all I remember."

Cockerham said her husband, Richard Ellerbee, told her during the attack that he had killed Candice and he was going to kill her as well. She managed to escape and get help.

Cockerham sued the two Jonesville, N.C., officers who she says told her -- just hours before her husband's savage attack -- that he would be arrested that night. She settled with the town – which did not admit any wrongdoing -- for nearly half a million dollars in 2009. Ellerbee fled to New Jersey, where, a few days after the attack, he doused himself with gasoline and burned himself to death.

GPS Tracking to Better Enforce Restraining Orders

Rosenfeld said the attack against Cockerham and other women could have been prevented by employing new technology, such as a GPS monitoring device.

"We need better methods of containment, including GPS monitoring, to enforce orders of protection," she said. "GPS is a very effective tool to prove the violations and to detect the violations and they can stop an offender in his tracks."

Police in Massachusetts and 14 other states are beginning to use GPS technology for those who violate restraining orders against them.

At the Massachusetts Probation office, deputy commissioner Paul Lucci said GPS puts victims in a protected zone. Offenders wear an ankle bracelet that is tracked by GPS and monitored 24 hours a day. They are barred from certain "restriction zones" where their victims are known to be, and if they violate those zones, authorities know instantly.

"We have had 100 percent success rate" with GPS monitoring, Rosenfeld said. "And it makes me a little nervous to say that. But also we have not had a domestic violence homicide in the areas where we have high-risk teams in place."

Rosenfeld suggested that the best way to protect women from predictable homicides is with security forces and specialized police, who are trained to recognize the context and pattern in the violations.

Mike Bischof continued the work his sister began, and last year, the Illinois legislature passed a bill giving judges and law enforcement the latitude to use GPS monitoring in domestic violence situations where orders of protection are violated. The law is named for Cindy Bischof.

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