Tarantino and Rodriguez: Who's the Man?

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TAPPER:
If the parent takes them.

TARANTINO:
Yes.

RODRIGUEZ:
No one under 17 admitted without a parent. And they've started being more strict about that -- when was it? About five, six years ago?

TARANTINO:
They were always strict about that when I was a kid.

RODRIGUEZ:
Well, even more so. They've been more strict about it recently…You have to show an ID now and --

TARANTINO:
And not only that. They were always pretty tough about it, a 17-year-old babysitter couldn't take me to see an R-rated movie. It had to be an adult.

RODRIGUEZ:
I know they've been looking at how the advertising is being aimed in areas that kids could see things. And I know they've changed that. So, unless they're going back and looking at it again, I know that it was really effective when they did it the first time, which was a few years ago.

TARANTINO:
But the real reality is, look, we're talking about cool, sensationalistic movies, and a lot of kids like that stuff. I know I did. I responded to those posters. I responded to those ads in the newspaper, and if that was now, I'd be responding to that stuff on the Internet and the TV spot. "Well, that looks cool."

Maybe the ads aren't aimed towards kids, but after that opening weekend is over and they go back to school and they're on the playground and one of the kids saw it, "Man, you saw 'Planet Terror.' There's a scene where the helicopter cuts up the zombies." "Really? Oh, man, I've got to see that." You know, I just think that's groovy.

RODRIGUEZ:
I reacted really strongly back after I had done "Desperado." Some parent came up to me and said, "Oh, my kid loves your movie, 'Desperado.' They love it." I was like, "Oh, that's great. How old's your kid?" Said, "Well, he's almost seven." I was just like -- They're not supposed to see that.

And I thought, oh, I can see why they would like it, because of the action. But I thought if the parent is going to be that irresponsible to show something like that, maybe I should just make something like that for kids, something that has that kind of action, where they have those heroics and you have action sequences that get them dreaming about that sort of thing.

So I made "Spy Kids" because of that. And we made a series of them, because they were successful. Empower kids and give them really cool action sequences. And then I'm off the hook from parents coming up to me and saying those things. "Don't show them 'Desperado.' Show them 'Spy Kids.'"

TAPPER:
Has being a father made you even more responsible to these kinds of criticisms?

RODRIGUEZ:
I've been a father as long as I've been a filmmaker, practically. And I'm from a family of 10 kids. But I've always thought, when I was making these movies, they're R-rated movies. I never tried to squeeze a PG-13 out of them. I knew that they were for an adult audience or any kids around the age of 14 to 15, if the parents wanted to take them. But when it started being just a spillover, that little kids were just seeing it, because their parents just liked the movie themselves and thought, "Oh, Junior's there. He'll like it, too, because it's got action," I decided to start making some other types of movies as well.

Click here to continue reading the transcript of Jake Tapper's interview with Robert Rodriguez and Quentin Tarantino, plus his interview with "Grindhouse" star Kurt Russell.

Click here to visit the "Grindhouse" Web site (viewer discretion advised).

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