Tarantino and Rodriguez: Who's the Man?

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That was one of the things we actually wanted to get across was the fact that -- I keep using this as an example like it's a bad movie, and I actually like this movie a lot -- but it is not "Twilight Zone, The Movie." We aren't just doing vignettes and it's this omnibus kind of thing. It's a double feature.

And I was the kind of stick-in-the-mud about it. "It's got to be a double feature. It's got to be two movies. I know that will work."

TAPPER:
But Hollywood studios want films to be 120 minutes long at the most, and preferably 80 or 90 minutes. Studios get concerned about films that are too long…

RODRIGUEZ:
Merely because amount of show times you can fit in a day is usually why they want to keep things shorter. But, nowadays, you can put so many prints out and anyone who wants to come see the movie will be able to find a screening…

TAPPER:
Somebody must have said, "Quentin, Robert, can't we trim this down to…"

TARANTINO:
Well, you know, they knew it…Look, of course, as little as it can be would obviously be optimal. But they knew they were making a double feature from the very first day. So they knew we'd be around this area -- no matter what we said -- we'd be around this area come this time.

RODRIGUEZ:
What we ended up with were two movies that are 85 minutes long. And I don't think you really find any features that are -- they are all so bloated. So, actually, we like how neat and trim ours are…Like rocket ships. They fly really fast.

TARANTINO:
It actually gave us an opportunity, which, you know, most directors don't want to take, which is to see if their material can still work if you cut it right to the bone. I mean, almost past the bone. Can it still work? Will it still play? Will people still care? How much do they actually need to know?

Because, you know, once you get to a certain place -- especially if you are a writer-director, it's like, you can do what you want. So, of course, you do what you want. And that's why everyone's movie is two hours and 15 minutes.

'If Anybody You Love Has Been Hurt In a Car Crash, You Should Not See 'Death Proof''

TAPPER:
What's your favorite part of "Death Proof"? What part are you proudest of within that film?

TARANTINO:
Gosh, it would be the car chase, because I feel that I pulled it off. It was one of those things where if I didn't pull it off, then I wouldn't officially know for myself that I'm not as good a filmmaker as I thought I was. So that was a big deal.

TAPPER:
You said you wanted it to be one of the top three car chases of all time.

TARANTINO:
Yes.

TAPPER:
Do you think you succeeded?

TARANTINO:
I hope so. It's more for you to tell me. But I think I'll know good after like the first couple of weekends when I've watched it with like eight-nine audiences, and then I'll know whether or not I did it or not.

TAPPER:
What would the list be? "Bullitt"? "French Connection"?

TARANTINO:
Almost the entire movie of "Vanishing Point," "Dirty Mary, Crazy Larry," the first "Mad Max." Walter Hilton's "The Driver." Those would be some of my favorites.

But before I did the car chase, the female characters in "Death Proof" -- I was very proud of their voice. I was very proud of their femininity, basically. I was quite happy with them, because, to me, they look and they sound like girls, and they look and sound like girls now, not remembering back what they used to look and sound like, but these are girls right here, right now.

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