Double-Amputee Snowboarder Rules Slopes

World champion Amy Purdy shares her incredible story of loss and helping others.
5:15 | 03/16/12

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Transcript for Double-Amputee Snowboarder Rules Slopes
She's a three time World Cup gold medalist and she also happens to be a double amputee. She's Amy Purdy a pioneer in adaptive snowboarding. A -- -- first introduced at the winter X games. My colleague Cynthia McFadden hits the slopes and get some major insights from an athlete who's overcome seemingly insurmountable. -- -- I loved to ski I've been doing hasn't I was a kid growing up in Maine. But snowboarding. And maximize. OK I admit it I'm with and -- But the chance to learn from the world champions. -- that was just too much -- Every team and they actually come up. Eighty Purdy and I met up recently in Aspen Colorado. We -- -- -- to run for. She on the board meeting on -- On the lips she tell me a little bit about her life. The kid growing up in the Las Vegas desert dream about snow. I have -- every day I hadn't. Every weekend I had after school every holiday we had -- school and -- -- -- -- Until 1 morning thirteen years ago when she started to feel a bit weak. I came -- -- -- and I am just felt were now and she was nineteen -- Within 24 hours. My good friend a 20% chance living. Her bloodstream had been invaded by a deadly bacteria. Her body literally taken over by meningitis. I think kidney failure and and it had -- kidney transplant may 21 birthday. I lost my spleen and lost between a man left here my lakes really at the beginning rabies as part. -- -- Her legs were amputated just below her knees. The minute that I looked up from my common. I knew riot related that I was going to find -- -- discovered him. Unbelievably. Just seven months later -- hurting was on the board again. I need to really get back on the board after that expense. We took him. -- -- I think just passion -- And that way. I mean again -- and. When she started out in 2000 there was no prosthetic that work for snowboarding. So she and her doctor said about fashioning a foot from scratch that would work under snowboard. It's every and then kind of Frankenstein but it. -- and set foot -- -- already -- that's made of wood and actually. And then and it's an already existing in England joins in any sightings -- -- pieces that we just put together a differently. That I had with. Today at 32 she is a world champion having won three World Cup gold medals in adapted snowboarding. His also founded a nonprofit company -- action sports to offer other physically challenged people a chance to experience for themselves. What snowboarding has meant for her. Tell you they don't want it holds -- united. People like 24 year old Colin -- The marine sergeant lost both of his legs to a roadside bomb in Afghanistan. Last man. David let me take it in the position it's all. It's -- that's what's great about our programs as it really is by example it's and not -- beaten. Able bodied -- in summoning Americans can be okay they'll actually did concede that it isn't. And I suppose for all of us. The biggest -- -- our lives firm's letterhead it's absolutely and 100% our biggest disability is saying -- here. This is Larry that I thought I was ready to try and conquer my own fear my first ever snowboarding months. K seven having roaming hands actually say you're in -- standard. And a little -- that you get elected -- slightly -- monster in the evening again and heels. Thank you -- Amy Daugherty has accused him Richards says go all the way -- It's not just her courage and self discipline and it's -- belief in yourself that make you believe in yourself. I loved. The teacher not just of the board. Of -- Reminding me that this journey is really what can make. An infant. And. A simulated Tony that I going to leave my lake at age nineteen. I would've thought that there's absolutely no way at the -- panel that's. It then it happens and I realized there's so much more than this life and I life isn't about -- today. For Nightline I'm Cynthia McFadden in Aspen Colorado.

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

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