Air Marshals Gone Wild?

Tales of bigotry, incompetence, and a marshal asleep onboard with a loaded gun.
4:45 | 02/07/12

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Transcript for Air Marshals Gone Wild?
Among the countless ways 9/11 change this country was these sudden proliferation. Of air marshals and maybe you've tried it. Spot the undercover lawman among your fellow passengers well tonight the disturbing revelation that the guy with the gun. Just might be the same -- snoring. ABC's Brian Ross investigates Brian. Bill there are an estimated 4000 federal air marshals and much of how they do their jobs is kept secret to protect undercover role on hundreds of flights every day. But that's secrecy has also helped to hide what some current and former air marshals tell ABC news is outrageous conduct. Behavior that sounds more like something from animal house and one of the country's most important law enforcement agencies. Their job is to make sure this. Never happens again. Heavily armed -- undercover they fit in with all the other passengers until something happens -- are -- Then trained to swing into action and make split second decisions with mature professional judgment it. But a decade after the 9/11 attacks that are disturbing concerns. About the billion dollar air Marshal program. Florida senator Bill Nelson as demanded a federal investigation. Of this critically important agents. The lives of the traveling public -- at stake current and former air marshals tell ABC news that behind the scenes. This air -- office in Orlando and and others across the country. There is a striking lack of professionalism. I expect. My federal law enforcement officers to set the bar. Not to act like a bunch of school kid punks. One -- example -- distorted air -- version of the popular game show jeopardy. This game is played exactly like the game on TV news former air Marshal Steve Theo droplets took pictures of -- -- in the air Marshal training office in Orlando two years the categories are all slurs. Apparently meant to -- minority and gay air marshals. Category -- smokers words. Directly aimed at gay males. Are gang listed African Americans sometimes called buckwheat. We -- categories like Ellen DeGeneres. If you're -- female including one who later killed herself in a suicide at least partially blamed on the jeopardy game. Anybody that's not like them will. There against. -- party operated of those conditions. Also present during our interview where three currently serving air marshals who are not allowed to appear publicly. I am speaking for him he also said he spoke for this air -- -- -- -- Who says she was the victim of sexual misconduct and assault by a senior manager. -- told -- she could not speak publicly. -- her discrimination complaint is spent. It was attempting to show off his personal private ports without -- zipping his pants. Over the last five years -- marshalls have been documenting the alleged bad behavior of their bosses. Air marshals say this photo shows another senior manager since retired sound asleep on a flight to Atlanta on duty and fully. Now you need to know as a terrorist gets all that gun. He's got a free -- that airplane. Air marshals say this photo shows a supervisor whose idea of a joke was to jump into a nativity scene and the main square in Brussels Belgian. It's been an air marshals gone -- This is unprofessional. This is unacceptable. Now the report senator Nelson demand -- the Homeland Security inspector general is to be made public Thursday. But obtained early by ABC news. It concludes that for all the allegations and problems perceived or real at the air marshals they do not appear to have compromised the service's mission. Conclusion welcome today. By the head of the TSA John Disco. But senator Nelson says he's not so sure about. Sooner or later you know if you do not have people operating at their peak efficiency. Then you take the risk that the terrorists. It's gonna get away -- it's dirty team. 76% of the air -- surveyed said they felt the mission to protect the public has not been compromised. That leaves about one out of four some 1000 air marshals who still seem to think there is a problem. That makes inflight safety and security less good than it should be.

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

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