Plastic Surgery Do-Overs

Two celebrity plastic surgeons operate on high-profile patients hoping to redo work they had done.
8:10 | 06/23/14

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Transcript for Plastic Surgery Do-Overs
Last year alone, millions of Americans spent billions of dollars to change the way they look. But for some, that new look isn't what they were hoping for at all. Tonight we investigate the other side of plastic surgery. As ABC's Neal Karlinsky learned, not everyone ends up with the body of his or her dreams. It's part of our series "Confessions of a pretty face." Louise Jenkins, I'm 34, and my breasts look like Frankenstein. . Reporter: As plastic surgery goes, there's that perceived ideal of perfection. And then there's what Alicia Jenkins says she wound up with after breast implants. So you had a really significant uniboob. It's the worst I've ever seen. Significant uniboob. You heard right, you heard uniboob, as in her breasts fused together. I guess it means the pockets open up and the implants touch each other. I guess the muscle or tissue over my sternum was completely detached and it just was one, basically. Tell me what it felt like. There's no way to describe it. I couldn't do a whole lot, couldn't lift my son, couldn't sit on the floor and play because I would be out of breath. Reporter: She says it was after the birth of her son that she decided to get implants. I breast-fed him and after I was done with that they were just left two completely different sizes. Nothing I had fit. My bras didn't fit anymore. Reporter: To say this isn't what she had in mind when she first went under the knife is an understatement. I didn't think ever in a million years I would end up with the results that I had. I just thought that I would have amazing perfect boobs when I got out and life would move on for me. But it didn't happen that way. Reporter: Turns out she's not alone. When enough people run into odd problems fixing their breasts, noses, eyes, you name it, this is what comes next. Meet doctors terry Dubrow and Paul nassi, specialists in revision plastic surgery and stars of the new e-reality show premiering June 24th, "Botched," plastic surgery gone wrong. Virgin again. Reporter: This is what happens when they get botched. Two crusading doctors trying to fix -- How many surgeries have you had on your nose? Six. Reporter: And sometimes weird patients. My reason for contacting you is because I was looking for a surgeon to help me in my quest to rebuild and modify my body. So I've come up with some new plans for a quadriceps implant, calf implants, lat implants. You devised these? Yeah, yeah. I did them myself. Reporter: Americans spent more than $7 billion on plastic surgery last year. The doctors say the show captured what they see in their practices all the time, the often hidden but quietly whispered about mistakes. What does it say about society that this show exists, that people are having these problems? When there's plastic surgery, there's surgery. When there's surgery there's complications. Plus sometimes great isn't good enough. They want perfect. And that pursuit of perfection can sometimes lead to major problems in plastic surgery. Reporter: The doctor says many of the problems stem from a case of buyer beware. I think the number one reason why patients seek out a revision specialist is because they didn't do their proper research in finding the right doctor. So many doctors are not board certified facial plastic like me, or plastic surgeons, they're doing all types of plastic surgery. Reporter: According to the doctor breast implants are the most popular, turns out means they are the most commonly messed up. I've seen the entire gamut from too large breast implants that are placed that erode their way through the skin, when the patient opens their bra you're looking straight at an implant that's worn a hole through their breast skin. Reporter: It's not just bad plastic surgery but difficult patients like less than shy supermodel Janice Dickinson. What bothers you most? My breasts have been in there about 30 years. Reporter: For her it wasn't a case of something botched so much as neglected. Dr. Dubrow says breast implants need to be replaced 10 to 15 years. The focus has been on her face. Suical procedures on her have been focused in the upper area. I think she was tired of the paparazzi catching her in photos where she had really bad breasts with lots of rippling, very thin skin, and it impaired her ability to get certain kinds of jobs. Reporter: She says her 30-year-old implants were having problems and she wanted Dr. Dubrow to fix them. So she didn't seem to want to follow his instructions after surgery. What is this? The drain from my boobs. You took your drain out? Kill me. This is so dangerous, Janice. Oh my god. I'm sorry. So sue me. The most challenging patient I've ever had. Put it this way,fy never operate on Janice Dickinson again, that would be too soon. I had about eight or nine covers -- Reporter: We learned Dickins Dickinson, who likes to brag about a body rebuilt by plastic surgery -- Surgery is good for you. It works for you. Reporter: Can be a bit of a handful. Brow lift, yes, I've had my brow lifted. Yes, I've had calla Jen. Botox, yes, plenty. You love the botox? It has to be done. How about below the neck? You want to talk about my breasts? What was you've got. After my had my son the augmentation helped pump up the volume for me. Do you think you're addicted to plastic surgery? No. You've done a lot. I've done as much as every other actress and model out there, I'm just willing to talk about it. You worry that you're seeing so much of this that people have a problem? I do worry about it. There's patient hot have injected themselves with industrial grade silicone that you see in warehouses. People have gone across the border and had dangerous procedures done for discount that absolutely turned into a nightmare. Reporter: It isn't just a problem for the famous. Put your hands on your hips. And squish. Yeah. You're under the muscle for sure. Reporter: Alicia sells bikinis and says most of her customers have had breast implants too, which is why she never thought of it as much more complicated than coloring her hair. She says problems started soon after her surgery. She looked to Dr. Dubrow for help. Alicia's case was the most difficult I've ever seen. Everything you could ever not want to fix in breast surgery, Alicia had. Reporter: He was able to help Alicia. Something they're anxious to show off on the new show. Today she can finally pick up her toddler. Her husband says their experience should serve as a warning for a generation that looks at plastic surgery like buying a new pair of shoes. We got lucky, my wife's still here with us. It could have been worse. But yeah, we need to educate everybody, society as whole, let them know it's surgery, it's a big risk. Reporter: Doctors say although they only make up 1% or 2% of surgeries, not every botched job can be fixed. I hate to use this phrase but you get what you pay for. In general if you're trying to save money, don't do it on plastic surgery. Let get you in a bikini feeling comfortable as soon as possible. That's what I'm saying. Yeah. I can't figure out if you doing the show is good for business or terrible for business. I don't care if it's good or bad for business. I care that people understand the truth about plastic surgery. And they treat it like it is. And that is a serious surgical procedure with serious ramifications. It can turn into a horror show. It can and it does. Reporter: I'm Neal Karlinsky for "Nightline" in Newport beach, California.

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

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