ACSOR photo
  • Afghanistan 2010: Where Things Stand

    Members of the research team in Ghazni province, in central Afghanistan, review the questionnaire before embarking on field work. Interviews for the survey, sponsored by ABC News, the BBC, ARD German TV and The Washington Post, were conducted via 227 sampling points in all 34 of Afghanistan's provinces.
    ACSOR photo
  • Afghanistan 2010: Where Things Stand

    Field work for the survey in Khost, in southeastern Afghanistan. Sampling, interviewing and data production were managed by the Afghan Center for Socio-Economic and Opinion Research (ACSOR) in Kabul.
    ACSOR photo
  • Afghanistan 2010: Where Things Stand

    This interview was conducted in Kunar province in the East. Afghans overall have turned more negative in their assessment of the presence and performance of U.S. and NATO forces, but with sharply different regional patterns.
    ACSOR photo
  • Afghanistan 2010: Where Things Stand

    An interviewer asks the way from two children in Kunduz province, in the country's Northeast. Interviews, which averaged 36 minutes, were conducted by 209 interviewers (98 female and 111 male) in 33 supervised teams.
    ACSOR photo
  • Afghanistan 2010: Where Things Stand

    Reflecting cultural norms, male and female interviewing teams worked separately; male respondents were interviewed only by male interviewers, female respondents only by female interviewers. This photo shows household selection in Kunduz. The survey had a response rate of 81 percent.
    ACSOR photo
  • Afghanistan 2010: Where Things Stand

    The survey found an 11-point drop from last year in positive ratings of women's rights; they're lower in rural areas, and especially low in areas marked by a high degree of Taliban activity.
    ACSOR photo
  • Afghanistan 2010: Where Things Stand

    An interviewer and respondent in Laghman province, which borders Kabul in the East. While security remains the top-cited problem facing the country, there are many others. Forty percent of Afghans say their economic opportunities are getting worse, vs. just 22 percent who see improvement.
    ACSOR photo
  • Afghanistan 2010: Where Things Stand

    In preparation for field work, female interviewers review the questionnaire in Mazar-i-Sharif, the capital of Balkh province in the North. Supervisors reported a variety of hazards while conducting the survey, including Taliban clashes, suicide attacks, encounters with highway bandits - and transportation conditions one described as "anarchy."
    ACSOR photo
  • Afghanistan 2010: Where Things Stand

    An interview in Nimroz, in the Southwest. While living conditions are difficult by a variety of metrics, 69 percent of Afghans rate theirs positively overall - although far fewer, just 10 percent, say theirs are "very" good.
    ACSOR photo
  • Afghanistan 2010: Where Things Stand

    Fifty-nine percent of Afghans say their country is headed in the right direction, but that's down from 70 percent late last year. Fifty-six percent expect their children's lives to be better than their own. But only 36 percent now express confidence in U.S. and NATO forces to provide security in their area, close to half of what it was in 2006.
    ACSOR photo
  • Afghanistan 2010: Where Things Stand

    A farmer is interviewed in his field in Paktia, in the Southeast. The survey found an 11-point drop in positive ratings of the level of aid for agriculture, to just 34 percent - a key issue in a country that's more than three-quarters rural.
    ACSOR photo
  • Afghanistan 2010: Where Things Stand

    An interview in Takhar province, in the North. Among employed Afghans (almost all men), 53 percent are farmers, farm laborers or unskilled workers; another two in 10, skilled workers or artisans. Fifty-seven percent report incomes equaling $100 a month or less.
    ACSOR photo
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