Facebook After Death: Who Owns Your Pages When You Die?

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"In Oklahoma, if you are administrator of the estate of a deceased person's house and you find a box under their bed, you are well within your right to see what's inside that box and if property is worth distributing, you should distribute it accordingly." Kiesel told ABC News that the same idea goes for digital legacy.

Today marks the ninth Anniversary of the launch of Facebook, which currently has over 1 billion active users. That number, which has grown from just a million users in 2004, suggests there must be an enormous number of Facebook pages that must currently be occupied by deceased people.

Facebook has not completely ignored the growing number of deceased users. The site has created a function allowing Facebook pages to become memorials after they have died.

"Please use this form to request the memorialization of a deceased person's account," the site reads. "We extend our condolences and appreciate your patience and understanding throughout this process."

Memorialization of a Facebook page, however, can only be done via online request. And the terms of service for Facebook's say that it will not issue login and password information to family members of the deceased. The requestor must contact Facebook and request that the profile is taken down or memorialized.

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