Heng Sinith/AP Photo
  • Too Cool for APEC/G20? Leaders Skip Aloha Shirts and Uniforms During Photo Session

    U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton, center, shakes hands with Vietnam's Foreign Minister Pham Binh Minh, left, of Vietnam, and Thai Foreign Minister Surapong Tovichakchaikul while posing for a group photo at an East Asia Summit Ministerial Meeting at the Association of Southeast Asian Nations regional forum at Peace Palace in Phnom Penh, Cambodia, July 12, 2012.
    Heng Sinith/AP Photo
  • G20 Family Photo

    U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton, center, is shown during the G20 foreign ministers family photo in Los Cabos, Mexico, Monday, Feb. 20, 2012.
    Charles Dharapak/Pool/AP Photo
  • Apec Family Photos Through the Years

    President Obama and Australian Prime Minister Julia Gillard touch their heads while other leaders laugh for the official photo during the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation summit, Nov. 13, 2011, in Kapolei, Hawaii. Obama said the heads of state decided to forgo a tradition started by President Clinton nearly 20 years ago that had them posing in traditional fashions of the host nation.
    Koji Sasahara, Pool/AP Photo
  • Apec Family Photos Through the Years

    Wearing a white, tieless shirt called "barong tagalog," President Clinton leads Pacific Rim leaders in the wave, Nov. 25, 1996, during a group photo session outside the APEC meeting headquarters in Subic Bay, Philippines. In 1993, Clinton began the tradition when he gave leaders visiting the Seattle area bomber jackets to don in their group photo.
    David Longstreath/AP Photo
  • Apec Family Photos Through the Years

    Vice President Al Gore, right, and Thai Prime Minister Chuan Leekpai wear batik shirts as photographs are taken at the APEC leaders retreat in Cyberjaya, Malaysia, Nov. 18, 1998. The tradition of posing in a host nation's traditional garb has made it one of the more fun and memorable moments of the forum.
    Itsuo Inouye/AP Photo
  • Apec Family Photos Through the Years

    President Clinton attends the APEC summit, Nov. 14, 2000, in Brunei Darussalam. President Obama is not the first to skip the lighthearted tradition. Last year, Japan opted out of the ritual as officials blamed a tight schedule and said that kimonos might not be suitable for a photo op.
    David Hume Kennerly/Getty Images
  • Apec Family Photos Through the Years

    Australian Prime Minister John Howard, left, and President Bush wear silk tangzhuang jackets during a group photo session of the APEC summit in Shanghai, China, Oct. 21, 2001.
    Eriko Sugita, Pool/AP Photo
  • Apec Family Photos Through the Years

    President Bush and Russian President Vladimir Putin don ponchos for the official portrait at the APEC summit in Santiago, Chile, Nov. 21, 2004.
    MCT/Newscom
  • Apec Family Photos Through the Years

    APEC leaders including President Bush wear traditional Vietnamese Ao Dai clothes Nov. 19, 2006 in Hanoi at the end of the APEC summit.
    Hoang Dinh Nam/AFP/Getty Images
  • Apec Family Photos Through the Years

    President Bush speaks with Vietnam President Nguyen Minh Triet during the APEC summit family photo, Nov. 23, 2008 in Lima, Peru.
    Luis Acosta/AFP/Getty Images
  • Apec Family Photos Through the Years

    International leaders, from left, Chilean President Sebastian Pinera Echenique, Brunei Darussalam Sultan Haji Hassanal Bolkiah, President Obama and Japanese Prime Minister Naoto Kan pose for the family photo at the APEC Summit, Nov. 13, 2010 in Yokohama, Japan. Japan was the first to break with the photo tradition.
    TIm Sloan/AFP/Getty Images
  • Apec Family Photos Through the Years

    APEC leaders wave during the photo session Nov. 13, 2011. Late Sunday, Obama explained the change in routine: "I suggested to leaders, we gave them a [Hawaiian aloha] shirt and I promise you if they wanted to wear it that would have been fine but I didn't hear a lot of complaints about breaking precedent," he said.
    Charles Dharapak/AP Photo
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